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A Political History of the Two IrelandsConflict and conciliation: identities and change, 1960–2011

A Political History of the Two Irelands: Conflict and conciliation: identities and change, 1960–2011 [The 1960s witnessed the promise of great improvement in political relations in Ireland, north and south. In the first half of the decade, the new Northern Ireland prime minister, Captain Terence O’Neill, urged tolerance of different religious and political views within Northern Ireland, and encouraged better north-south relations. Sean Lemass, the new Irish taoiseach, welcomed north-south links and a Dáil Éireann committee in December 1967 recommended significant changes to the Irish constitution. Such promise, however, did not materialise. By the end of the decade there had been extensive rioting in Northern Ireland and some loss of life in consequence of which British troops were on northern streets while Irish troops had been moved up to the border. The confrontation and violence continued for another three decades leading to a loss of over 3000 lives. Many attempts were to be made to create ‘peace and stability’, but all failed until, finally, the Belfast Agreement was signed on Good Friday, 10 April 1998. Nonetheless, it took another decade before these arrangements would operate fully. How do we account for the failure of the early efforts to improve relations? Why did subsequent attempts fail? How do we explain the eventual success of the new arrangements?] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

A Political History of the Two IrelandsConflict and conciliation: identities and change, 1960–2011

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Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan UK
Copyright
© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 2012
ISBN
978-0-230-36147-8
Pages
107 –154
DOI
10.1057/9780230363403_4
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[The 1960s witnessed the promise of great improvement in political relations in Ireland, north and south. In the first half of the decade, the new Northern Ireland prime minister, Captain Terence O’Neill, urged tolerance of different religious and political views within Northern Ireland, and encouraged better north-south relations. Sean Lemass, the new Irish taoiseach, welcomed north-south links and a Dáil Éireann committee in December 1967 recommended significant changes to the Irish constitution. Such promise, however, did not materialise. By the end of the decade there had been extensive rioting in Northern Ireland and some loss of life in consequence of which British troops were on northern streets while Irish troops had been moved up to the border. The confrontation and violence continued for another three decades leading to a loss of over 3000 lives. Many attempts were to be made to create ‘peace and stability’, but all failed until, finally, the Belfast Agreement was signed on Good Friday, 10 April 1998. Nonetheless, it took another decade before these arrangements would operate fully. How do we account for the failure of the early efforts to improve relations? Why did subsequent attempts fail? How do we explain the eventual success of the new arrangements?]

Published: Oct 3, 2015

Keywords: British Government; Irish Constitution; Irish Government; Irish Unity; Nationalist Party

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