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A Primal Perspective on the Philosophy of ReligionThe Concept of Revelation and the Primal Religious Tradition

A Primal Perspective on the Philosophy of Religion: The Concept of Revelation and the Primal... CHAPTER VI THE CONCEPT OF REVELATION AND THE PRIMAL RELIGIOUS TRADITION Scholars have often been accused of perpetuating the very world they analyze. If one succeeds in achieving, even partially, what one has attempted in this chapter, it should render the scholarly community less liable to that accusation. Its goal, however, is modest and certainly much more modest than that of Marx, who would that one studied philosophy not merely to understand but to change the world. This chapter studies the world, especially the primal world, for how it might change our understanding of philosophy, or more precisely, the philosophy of religion. The purpose of this chapter then is to examine how the concept of revelation in the philosophy of religion fares, when that concept is exposed to materials drawn from primal religions. This task has not hitherto been attempted from within the philosophy of religion to the best of our knowledge. II The first issue which arises on undertaking such an enterprise is that of the adequacy, in the present context, of the Christian approach to revelation, which is more or less taken for granted as normative in the discussion of the topic in the philosophy of religion. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

A Primal Perspective on the Philosophy of ReligionThe Concept of Revelation and the Primal Religious Tradition

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Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
© Springer 2006
ISBN
978-1-4020-5013-8
Pages
93 –109
DOI
10.1007/1-4020-5014-3_6
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

CHAPTER VI THE CONCEPT OF REVELATION AND THE PRIMAL RELIGIOUS TRADITION Scholars have often been accused of perpetuating the very world they analyze. If one succeeds in achieving, even partially, what one has attempted in this chapter, it should render the scholarly community less liable to that accusation. Its goal, however, is modest and certainly much more modest than that of Marx, who would that one studied philosophy not merely to understand but to change the world. This chapter studies the world, especially the primal world, for how it might change our understanding of philosophy, or more precisely, the philosophy of religion. The purpose of this chapter then is to examine how the concept of revelation in the philosophy of religion fares, when that concept is exposed to materials drawn from primal religions. This task has not hitherto been attempted from within the philosophy of religion to the best of our knowledge. II The first issue which arises on undertaking such an enterprise is that of the adequacy, in the present context, of the Christian approach to revelation, which is more or less taken for granted as normative in the discussion of the topic in the philosophy of religion.

Published: Jan 1, 2006

Keywords: Religious Movement; Traditional Religion; Sacred Place; Dialectical Structure; Christian Concept

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