Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Abbé Sicard’s Deaf EducationThe Ascent to Paris

Abbé Sicard’s Deaf Education: The Ascent to Paris [Education of the deaf through private tutoring was known in Europe well before 1789, but the first systematic language of signs and state school for the deaf only came into being during the reforming monarchy and the French Revolution. Abbé Charles de l’Epée (1712–1789) was the founder of the first classes on rue Moulins in Paris in 1760. His pupil abbé Roch-Ambroise-Cucurron Sicard (1742–1822), named “royal teacher of deaf-mutes” by Louis XVI, cofounded a school for the deaf in Bordeaux in 1786, where he used Epée’s principles. Sicard is known today to historians of the deaf, but he is barely known to others, even the deaf themselves. However, as the national instituteur of the National Institution of Deaf-Mutes, Sicard survived the half dozen regimes that subsidized him until his death in 1822. He was a professor at the first Ecole Normale (1795) and a member of the original National Institute (1796) and the restored French Academy (1803). In addition, he wrote several, often reprinted, books on deaf-mute language and comparative, or “general,” grammar. Many of them are now available online.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Abbé Sicard’s Deaf EducationThe Ascent to Paris

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/abb-sicard-s-deaf-education-the-ascent-to-paris-g906uYC41S
Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan US
Copyright
© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Nature America Inc. 2015
ISBN
978-1-349-55275-7
Pages
1 –21
DOI
10.1057/9781137512864_1
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[Education of the deaf through private tutoring was known in Europe well before 1789, but the first systematic language of signs and state school for the deaf only came into being during the reforming monarchy and the French Revolution. Abbé Charles de l’Epée (1712–1789) was the founder of the first classes on rue Moulins in Paris in 1760. His pupil abbé Roch-Ambroise-Cucurron Sicard (1742–1822), named “royal teacher of deaf-mutes” by Louis XVI, cofounded a school for the deaf in Bordeaux in 1786, where he used Epée’s principles. Sicard is known today to historians of the deaf, but he is barely known to others, even the deaf themselves. However, as the national instituteur of the National Institution of Deaf-Mutes, Sicard survived the half dozen regimes that subsidized him until his death in 1822. He was a professor at the first Ecole Normale (1795) and a member of the original National Institute (1796) and the restored French Academy (1803). In addition, he wrote several, often reprinted, books on deaf-mute language and comparative, or “general,” grammar. Many of them are now available online.]

Published: Dec 24, 2015

Keywords: Sign Language; Religious Order; Private Tutoring; French Revolution; Deaf Student

There are no references for this article.