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Are There Propositions?

Are There Propositions? ANDREA IACONA 1. SOME RATHER WIDESPREAD ASSUMPTIONS The word ‘proposition’ occurs quite often in philosophical discourse. Sometimes it is used as if the reader should already know what it means, while at other times its introduction is accompanied by some preliminary considerations. Usually, in the latter case the writer explains that the word refers to things of a certain kind, and tries to convince us that it is right to “admit” or “postulate” things of that kind. By far the most popular strategy is to appeal to our ordinary way of speaking. According to a well known line of argument, ‘proposition’ stands for what we intuitively take to be the object of a mental act such as thinking, believing, and so on. We ordinarily talk of things thought, believed, and so on, and we seem to presuppose that such things are other than the act of thinking them, believing them, and so on. For example, if we say that both Tom and Mary think that the sea is blue, we seem to presuppose that their respective acts of thinking are different while the thing thought, that the sea is blue, is the same. Similarly, if we say that Tom http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Erkenntnis Springer Journals

Are There Propositions?

Erkenntnis , Volume 58 (3) – Oct 5, 2004

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References (12)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Philosophy; Philosophy, general; Epistemology; Ontology; Ethics; Logic
ISSN
0165-0106
eISSN
1572-8420
DOI
10.1023/A:1022614214146
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ANDREA IACONA 1. SOME RATHER WIDESPREAD ASSUMPTIONS The word ‘proposition’ occurs quite often in philosophical discourse. Sometimes it is used as if the reader should already know what it means, while at other times its introduction is accompanied by some preliminary considerations. Usually, in the latter case the writer explains that the word refers to things of a certain kind, and tries to convince us that it is right to “admit” or “postulate” things of that kind. By far the most popular strategy is to appeal to our ordinary way of speaking. According to a well known line of argument, ‘proposition’ stands for what we intuitively take to be the object of a mental act such as thinking, believing, and so on. We ordinarily talk of things thought, believed, and so on, and we seem to presuppose that such things are other than the act of thinking them, believing them, and so on. For example, if we say that both Tom and Mary think that the sea is blue, we seem to presuppose that their respective acts of thinking are different while the thing thought, that the sea is blue, is the same. Similarly, if we say that Tom

Journal

ErkenntnisSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 5, 2004

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