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Authoritarianism in the Middle EastThe Arab World between 2011 and 2014: From Revolutionary Configurations to the State of Violence

Authoritarianism in the Middle East: The Arab World between 2011 and 2014: From Revolutionary... [The revolutionary contests of 2011 constituted the starting point of a new historical cycle in the contemporary history of the Arab world and the Middle East broadly speaking. No wonder then that they have been widely interpreted by the scholars of this region, but also by those working on the comparative history and sociology of revolutions throughout the world. While some researchers have analyzed them within the framework of an integrated theory of resistance (Tripp, 2013), others have qualified them as the second Arab awakening with a largely undetermined future (Dawisha, 2013). Some explained 2011 with the emergence of new social movements (Khosrokhavar, 2012); others suggested that thanks to these massive protests against their own regimes, the Arab societies were finally leaving the colonial past behind them (Dabashi, 2012; Lynch, 2013). Whereas some French scholars and observers have detected in the Arab contests a universal event, drawing parallels with the pre-1792 period of the French Revolution (Stora and Plenel, 2011), some jurists thought that they could open new avenues to redefine the ongoing debates on international law and universal rights (Panara and Wilson, 2013).] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Authoritarianism in the Middle EastThe Arab World between 2011 and 2014: From Revolutionary Configurations to the State of Violence

Editors: Karakoç, Jülide

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References (27)

Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan UK
Copyright
© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 2015
ISBN
978-1-349-49580-1
Pages
67 –91
DOI
10.1057/9781137445551_4
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[The revolutionary contests of 2011 constituted the starting point of a new historical cycle in the contemporary history of the Arab world and the Middle East broadly speaking. No wonder then that they have been widely interpreted by the scholars of this region, but also by those working on the comparative history and sociology of revolutions throughout the world. While some researchers have analyzed them within the framework of an integrated theory of resistance (Tripp, 2013), others have qualified them as the second Arab awakening with a largely undetermined future (Dawisha, 2013). Some explained 2011 with the emergence of new social movements (Khosrokhavar, 2012); others suggested that thanks to these massive protests against their own regimes, the Arab societies were finally leaving the colonial past behind them (Dabashi, 2012; Lynch, 2013). Whereas some French scholars and observers have detected in the Arab contests a universal event, drawing parallels with the pre-1792 period of the French Revolution (Stora and Plenel, 2011), some jurists thought that they could open new avenues to redefine the ongoing debates on international law and universal rights (Panara and Wilson, 2013).]

Published: Nov 5, 2015

Keywords: Middle East; Arab Country; Arab World; Domino Effect; Muslim Brotherhood

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