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Biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

Biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons The intent of this review is to provide an outline of the microbial degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. A catabolically diverse microbial community, consisting of bacteria, fungi and algae, metabolizes aromatic compounds. Molecular oxygen is essential for the initial hydroxylation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by microorganisms. In contrast to bacteria, filamentous fungi use hydroxylation as a prelude to detoxification rather than to catabolism and assimilation. The biochemical principles underlying the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are examined in some detail. The pathways of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon catabolism are discussed. Studies are presented on the relationship between the chemical structure of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and the rate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biodegradation Springer Journals

Biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

Biodegradation , Volume 3 (3) – May 30, 2004

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References (247)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright
Subject
Life Sciences; Microbiology; Soil Science & Conservation; Geochemistry; Terrestrial Pollution; Waste Water Technology / Water Pollution Control / Water Management / Aquatic Pollution; Waste Management/Waste Technology
ISSN
0923-9820
eISSN
1572-9729
DOI
10.1007/BF00129093
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The intent of this review is to provide an outline of the microbial degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. A catabolically diverse microbial community, consisting of bacteria, fungi and algae, metabolizes aromatic compounds. Molecular oxygen is essential for the initial hydroxylation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by microorganisms. In contrast to bacteria, filamentous fungi use hydroxylation as a prelude to detoxification rather than to catabolism and assimilation. The biochemical principles underlying the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are examined in some detail. The pathways of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon catabolism are discussed. Studies are presented on the relationship between the chemical structure of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and the rate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems.

Journal

BiodegradationSpringer Journals

Published: May 30, 2004

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