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Cartesian EmpiricismsRohault’s Cartesian Physics

Cartesian Empiricisms: Rohault’s Cartesian Physics [In 1671, Jacques Rohault published his Traité de physique, a textbook on physics relying on his weekly conferences held in Paris. A good mathematician and at the same time a curious experimenter, Rohault was one of the main Cartesian figures of his time. Connected to Parisian philosophical circles, Rohault was deeply concerned with the reception of Descartes’ philosophical views. He was associated with Claude Clerselier and he encouraged Pierre-Sylvain Régis to spread Cartesianism in Toulouse. Performing experiments and using instruments in his observations, allowed for a very good reception of Rohault’s natural philosophy in the late seventeenth century. Thus, his textbook on physics was quickly translated and disseminated across Europe. Of a particular interest is the English version of this book, which was annotated by the celebrated Newtonian, Samuel Clarke. This chapter will provide a deep analysis of Rohault’s system of physics, with an emphasis on his experimental approach. Equally important, the Newtonian reception of Rohault’s treatise will be discussed in close connection to the structure of his philosophical system and the methodological novelties introduced by the French philosopher.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Cartesian EmpiricismsRohault’s Cartesian Physics

Part of the Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Book Series (volume 31)
Editors: Dobre, Mihnea; Nyden, Tammy
Cartesian Empiricisms — Oct 28, 2013

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References (36)

Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013
ISBN
978-94-007-7689-0
Pages
203 –226
DOI
10.1007/978-94-007-7690-6_9
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[In 1671, Jacques Rohault published his Traité de physique, a textbook on physics relying on his weekly conferences held in Paris. A good mathematician and at the same time a curious experimenter, Rohault was one of the main Cartesian figures of his time. Connected to Parisian philosophical circles, Rohault was deeply concerned with the reception of Descartes’ philosophical views. He was associated with Claude Clerselier and he encouraged Pierre-Sylvain Régis to spread Cartesianism in Toulouse. Performing experiments and using instruments in his observations, allowed for a very good reception of Rohault’s natural philosophy in the late seventeenth century. Thus, his textbook on physics was quickly translated and disseminated across Europe. Of a particular interest is the English version of this book, which was annotated by the celebrated Newtonian, Samuel Clarke. This chapter will provide a deep analysis of Rohault’s system of physics, with an emphasis on his experimental approach. Equally important, the Newtonian reception of Rohault’s treatise will be discussed in close connection to the structure of his philosophical system and the methodological novelties introduced by the French philosopher.]

Published: Oct 28, 2013

Keywords: Ontological Commitment; Natural Philosopher; Experimental Philosopher; Biographical Detail; Systematic Exposition

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