Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Cartesian EmpiricismsWas There a Cartesian Experimentalism in 1660s France?

Cartesian Empiricisms: Was There a Cartesian Experimentalism in 1660s France? [In order to determine if there existed an experimentalist Cartesianism in France in the 1660s, I concentrate on Jacques Rohault and address the three following questions. (1) Is there a difference in the way Descartes and Rohault deal with experiments? I state that there is no doctrinal difference between them: the experiments they carry out are of the same order; they attribute the same epistemological functions to them; they share the same ontology. The main difference between them is that, unlike Descartes, Rohault made experiments a means of popularization of the Cartesian philosophy. (2) How does Rohault treat experiments in his Mercredis? Studying quite closely the evolution that led to the greater priority attributed to experiments in the scientific circles that prefigure the Académie des sciences, I show that, in 1660s France, the treatment Rohault give to experiments in his Mercredis is exceeded by the radical experimentalism of the other French learned societies. (3) Did this radical experimentalism bring out a transformation of Cartesianism? I establish that, while the first criticism to Descartes concerns his dogmatic pretentions, there emerges in the last 30 years of the seventeenth century what has since become a historiographic cliché, the idea that Cartesians neglected experiments in favor of hypotheses and speculation.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Cartesian EmpiricismsWas There a Cartesian Experimentalism in 1660s France?

Part of the Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Book Series (volume 31)
Editors: Dobre, Mihnea; Nyden, Tammy
Cartesian Empiricisms — Oct 28, 2013

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/cartesian-empiricisms-was-there-a-cartesian-experimentalism-in-1660s-0YzZOSVy84

References (48)

Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013
ISBN
978-94-007-7689-0
Pages
47 –88
DOI
10.1007/978-94-007-7690-6_3
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[In order to determine if there existed an experimentalist Cartesianism in France in the 1660s, I concentrate on Jacques Rohault and address the three following questions. (1) Is there a difference in the way Descartes and Rohault deal with experiments? I state that there is no doctrinal difference between them: the experiments they carry out are of the same order; they attribute the same epistemological functions to them; they share the same ontology. The main difference between them is that, unlike Descartes, Rohault made experiments a means of popularization of the Cartesian philosophy. (2) How does Rohault treat experiments in his Mercredis? Studying quite closely the evolution that led to the greater priority attributed to experiments in the scientific circles that prefigure the Académie des sciences, I show that, in 1660s France, the treatment Rohault give to experiments in his Mercredis is exceeded by the radical experimentalism of the other French learned societies. (3) Did this radical experimentalism bring out a transformation of Cartesianism? I establish that, while the first criticism to Descartes concerns his dogmatic pretentions, there emerges in the last 30 years of the seventeenth century what has since become a historiographic cliché, the idea that Cartesians neglected experiments in favor of hypotheses and speculation.]

Published: Oct 28, 2013

Keywords: Royal Society; Seventeenth Century; Scientific Revolution; Moral Critique; Travel Journal

There are no references for this article.