Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Citizenship, Belonging and Attachment in the ‘War on Terror’

Citizenship, Belonging and Attachment in the ‘War on Terror’ The ‘war on terror’ has had an enormous impact on citizens’ legal rights and legal status. Using data from interviews with British Pakistani Kashmiri Muslims, this paper explores how the change to citizens’ legal rights and legal status in the ‘war on terror’, the legal dimension of citizenship, has impacted the psychological dimension of citizenship. Through denoting legal rights, equality and status the study revealed the powerful role of the state and the police in shaping citizens’ perceptions of the legal dimension of citizenship. The paper explores how changes to participants’ perceptions of their legal status and legal rights are instrumental in shaping the psychological dimension of citizenship—participants’ sense of loyalty, belonging and attachment to their British identity and their Islamic identity. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Critical Criminology Springer Journals

Citizenship, Belonging and Attachment in the ‘War on Terror’

Critical Criminology , Volume 24 (1) – May 28, 2015

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/citizenship-belonging-and-attachment-in-the-war-on-terror-smKx4mdgJq

References (59)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 by Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht
Subject
Social Sciences; Criminology & Criminal Justice
ISSN
1205-8629
eISSN
1572-9877
DOI
10.1007/s10612-015-9279-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The ‘war on terror’ has had an enormous impact on citizens’ legal rights and legal status. Using data from interviews with British Pakistani Kashmiri Muslims, this paper explores how the change to citizens’ legal rights and legal status in the ‘war on terror’, the legal dimension of citizenship, has impacted the psychological dimension of citizenship. Through denoting legal rights, equality and status the study revealed the powerful role of the state and the police in shaping citizens’ perceptions of the legal dimension of citizenship. The paper explores how changes to participants’ perceptions of their legal status and legal rights are instrumental in shaping the psychological dimension of citizenship—participants’ sense of loyalty, belonging and attachment to their British identity and their Islamic identity.

Journal

Critical CriminologySpringer Journals

Published: May 28, 2015

There are no references for this article.