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Comparison of model selection technique performance in predicting the spread of newly invasive species: a case study with Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans

Comparison of model selection technique performance in predicting the spread of newly invasive... Species distribution models (SDMs) increasingly have been used to anticipate the spread of invasive species. However, these models are powerful conservation tools only if they are biologically relevant, and thus validation of these models is essential. Here, we evaluate four model selection frameworks for their ability to identify a best fit model of spread under low data conditions early in an invasion, specifically testing the efficacy of methods that utilize absence data in addition to presence data in evaluating models. We test this question using a simulation where we generated data with varying confidence in the accuracy of the absence data, as absences in early invasions may become presences in the future, and increasing quantity of observation data to test the models. We create these simulations based on a real-world example of a newly emergent, invasive fungal pathogen, Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bsal). The simulation demonstrated that AIC and Likelihood consistently outperform both Kappa and AUC in selecting the true model as the best model when data are limited and absence data are low quality, with AIC providing the most conservative results due to penalties for overparameterization. With these results, we then used these techniques to compare five candidate models for predicting the spread of Bsal. Consistent with the simulation, the best fit model of the candidate models for Bsal was inconsistent across the four metrics. However, AIC, which performed best in the simulation study, suggested that the spread of Bsal into Western Europe was best predicted by a combination of bioclimatic suitability, salamander richness, and number of salamander imports. Our results highlight the difficulty in evaluating predictive models when data are limited and of low quality, as with a newly invasive species, but show that these challenges can be partially addressed with the appropriate model selection approach. Use of this approach is critical as SDMs of invasive species are often used to inform conservation policy and efforts before the invasion spreads, when limited data are available. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biological Invasions Springer Journals

Comparison of model selection technique performance in predicting the spread of newly invasive species: a case study with Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans

Biological Invasions , Volume 20 (8) – Mar 1, 2018

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References (54)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Life Sciences; Ecology; Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Plant Sciences; Developmental Biology
ISSN
1387-3547
eISSN
1573-1464
DOI
10.1007/s10530-018-1690-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Species distribution models (SDMs) increasingly have been used to anticipate the spread of invasive species. However, these models are powerful conservation tools only if they are biologically relevant, and thus validation of these models is essential. Here, we evaluate four model selection frameworks for their ability to identify a best fit model of spread under low data conditions early in an invasion, specifically testing the efficacy of methods that utilize absence data in addition to presence data in evaluating models. We test this question using a simulation where we generated data with varying confidence in the accuracy of the absence data, as absences in early invasions may become presences in the future, and increasing quantity of observation data to test the models. We create these simulations based on a real-world example of a newly emergent, invasive fungal pathogen, Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bsal). The simulation demonstrated that AIC and Likelihood consistently outperform both Kappa and AUC in selecting the true model as the best model when data are limited and absence data are low quality, with AIC providing the most conservative results due to penalties for overparameterization. With these results, we then used these techniques to compare five candidate models for predicting the spread of Bsal. Consistent with the simulation, the best fit model of the candidate models for Bsal was inconsistent across the four metrics. However, AIC, which performed best in the simulation study, suggested that the spread of Bsal into Western Europe was best predicted by a combination of bioclimatic suitability, salamander richness, and number of salamander imports. Our results highlight the difficulty in evaluating predictive models when data are limited and of low quality, as with a newly invasive species, but show that these challenges can be partially addressed with the appropriate model selection approach. Use of this approach is critical as SDMs of invasive species are often used to inform conservation policy and efforts before the invasion spreads, when limited data are available.

Journal

Biological InvasionsSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 1, 2018

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