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Converting a NationConversion and National Identity

Converting a Nation: Conversion and National Identity [In the last chapter, I argued that Manzoni’s novel advocated conversion to Catholicism as a means of establishing a modern Italian nationstate that retained its Catholic identity. It may seem surprising to suggest that a liberal Catholic like Manzoni would vigorously pursue conversion. And yet this was not unusual among neo-Guelph and liberal Catholic thinkers. Vincenzo Gioberti advocated conversion with his vision of an Italian nation-state based on Christian principles. Carlo Maria Curci, a Jesuit opponent of Gioberti, criticized the Giobertian conflation of Catholicism and nationhood, stating that Giobertian ideology was one in which “in the name of the Gospel, Parliament is proclaimed, in the name of the Pope, the Italian confederation, and in the name of Christian morals, the expulsion of the Germans from Lombard-Veneto.”1 While Gioberti condemned the persecution of religious minorities, his argument for open-mindedness was itself aimed at conversion. That is, rather than be persecuted, he argued that Jews be treated with Christian charity, since such kindness would lead them to convert of their own accord. Similarly, the liberal Catholic Giovanni Vicini criticized the Church for its excessive force in dealing with the Jewish community.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Converting a NationConversion and National Identity

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References (3)

Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan US
Copyright
© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Nature America Inc. 2008
ISBN
978-1-349-37407-6
Pages
105 –135
DOI
10.1057/9780230615816_5
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[In the last chapter, I argued that Manzoni’s novel advocated conversion to Catholicism as a means of establishing a modern Italian nationstate that retained its Catholic identity. It may seem surprising to suggest that a liberal Catholic like Manzoni would vigorously pursue conversion. And yet this was not unusual among neo-Guelph and liberal Catholic thinkers. Vincenzo Gioberti advocated conversion with his vision of an Italian nation-state based on Christian principles. Carlo Maria Curci, a Jesuit opponent of Gioberti, criticized the Giobertian conflation of Catholicism and nationhood, stating that Giobertian ideology was one in which “in the name of the Gospel, Parliament is proclaimed, in the name of the Pope, the Italian confederation, and in the name of Christian morals, the expulsion of the Germans from Lombard-Veneto.”1 While Gioberti condemned the persecution of religious minorities, his argument for open-mindedness was itself aimed at conversion. That is, rather than be persecuted, he argued that Jews be treated with Christian charity, since such kindness would lead them to convert of their own accord. Similarly, the liberal Catholic Giovanni Vicini criticized the Church for its excessive force in dealing with the Jewish community.]

Published: Nov 5, 2015

Keywords: National Identity; Jewish Community; Post Office; Papal State; Papal Supporter

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