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Culture and Well-BeingFactors Predicting the Subjective Well-Being of Nations

Culture and Well-Being: Factors Predicting the Subjective Well-Being of Nations [Subjective well-being (SWB) in 55 nations, reported in probability surveys and a large college student sample, was correlated with social, economic, and cultural characteristics of the nations. The SWB surveys, representing nations that include three fourths of the earth’s population, showed strong convergence. Separate measures of the predictor variables also converged and formed scales with high reliability, with the exception of the comparison variables. High income, individualism, human rights, and societal equality correlated strongly with each other, and with SWB across surveys. Income correlated with SWB even after basic need fulfillment was controlled. Only individualism persistently correlated with SWB when other predictors were controlled. Cultural homogeneity, income growth, and income comparison showed either low or inconsistent relations with SWB.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Culture and Well-BeingFactors Predicting the Subjective Well-Being of Nations

Part of the Social Indicators Research Series Book Series (volume 38)
Editors: Diener, Ed
Culture and Well-Being — Jan 1, 2009

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References (42)

Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
© Springer Netherlands 2009
ISBN
978-90-481-2351-3
Pages
43 –70
DOI
10.1007/978-90-481-2352-0_3
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[Subjective well-being (SWB) in 55 nations, reported in probability surveys and a large college student sample, was correlated with social, economic, and cultural characteristics of the nations. The SWB surveys, representing nations that include three fourths of the earth’s population, showed strong convergence. Separate measures of the predictor variables also converged and formed scales with high reliability, with the exception of the comparison variables. High income, individualism, human rights, and societal equality correlated strongly with each other, and with SWB across surveys. Income correlated with SWB even after basic need fulfillment was controlled. Only individualism persistently correlated with SWB when other predictors were controlled. Cultural homogeneity, income growth, and income comparison showed either low or inconsistent relations with SWB.]

Published: Jan 1, 2009

Keywords: Life Satisfaction; Social Comparison; Income Growth; Social Indicator Research; World Development Report

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