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Cultures of Mathematics and LogicTransmission and Interactions Among Different Types of Geometrical Argumentations: From Jesuits in China to Nam Pyŏng-Gil in Korea

Cultures of Mathematics and Logic: Transmission and Interactions Among Different Types of... [Transmission and interactions among different types of geometrical argumentations constitute some of the most interesting stories in the history of East Asian science and mathematics. Since the early years of the seventeenth century, the Chinese began to learn European science and mathematics introduced by missionaries and incorporate these into translations and into their own works. At first, Euclid’s Elements, with its hypothetico-deductive structure, was translated in early 1600s. However, one of the most influential mathematical treatises in late imperial China and in contemporary Korea, the Shuli jingyun (Essential Principles of Mathematics, 1723), was composed as a synthesis of all the Chinese and European mathematical knowledge that was available to the Qing emperor Kangxi (r. 1662–1722) himself and his royal mathematicians. A section in this mathematical compendium is entitled “Jihe yuanben” (Elements of geometry), which does not refer to the first Chinese translation of Euclid’s Elements bearing the same Chinese title. It is actually taken from lecture notes written by the French Jesuits Jean-François Gerbillon and Joachim Bouvet when they taught mathematics to Kangxi in the 1690s. These notes were in turn based on the French geometry textbook Elémens de Géométrie by the Jesuit Ignace-Gaston Pardies.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Cultures of Mathematics and LogicTransmission and Interactions Among Different Types of Geometrical Argumentations: From Jesuits in China to Nam Pyŏng-Gil in Korea

Part of the Trends in the History of Science Book Series
Editors: Ju, Shier; Löwe, Benedikt; Müller, Thomas; Xie, Yun

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References (14)

Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016
ISBN
978-3-319-31500-3
Pages
107 –123
DOI
10.1007/978-3-319-31502-7_6
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[Transmission and interactions among different types of geometrical argumentations constitute some of the most interesting stories in the history of East Asian science and mathematics. Since the early years of the seventeenth century, the Chinese began to learn European science and mathematics introduced by missionaries and incorporate these into translations and into their own works. At first, Euclid’s Elements, with its hypothetico-deductive structure, was translated in early 1600s. However, one of the most influential mathematical treatises in late imperial China and in contemporary Korea, the Shuli jingyun (Essential Principles of Mathematics, 1723), was composed as a synthesis of all the Chinese and European mathematical knowledge that was available to the Qing emperor Kangxi (r. 1662–1722) himself and his royal mathematicians. A section in this mathematical compendium is entitled “Jihe yuanben” (Elements of geometry), which does not refer to the first Chinese translation of Euclid’s Elements bearing the same Chinese title. It is actually taken from lecture notes written by the French Jesuits Jean-François Gerbillon and Joachim Bouvet when they taught mathematics to Kangxi in the 1690s. These notes were in turn based on the French geometry textbook Elémens de Géométrie by the Jesuit Ignace-Gaston Pardies.]

Published: Aug 11, 2016

Keywords: Pointed Solid; Geometrical Argumentation; Intuitive Approach; Chinese Text; Western Learning

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