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David Hilbert and the axiomatization of physics (1894–1905)

David Hilbert and the axiomatization of physics (1894–1905) Arch. Hist. Exact Sci. 51 (1997) 83-198. 9 Springer-Verlag 1997 David Hilbert and the Axiomatization of Physics (1894-1905) LEO CORRY Communicated by J. NORTON Contents 1. Introduction .......................................... 83 2. Hilbert as Student and Teacher ............................ 85 3. The Background to Hilbert's Axiomatic Approach: Geometry and Physics 89 4. Axiomatics, Geometry and Physics in Hilbert's Early Lectures ........ 104 5. Grundlagen der Geometrie ................................. 109 6. The Frege-Hilbert Correspondence .......................... 116 7. The 1900 List of Problems .............................. 119 8. Hilbert's 1905 Lectures on the Axiomatic Method ................ 123 Arithmetic and Geometry ............................... 125 Mechanics ......................................... 131 Thermodynamics ..................................... 148 Probability Calculus ................................... 158 Kinetic Theory of Gases ................................ 162 Insurance Mathematics ................................. 171 Electrodynamics ..................................... 172 Psychophysics ....................................... 179 9. Concluding Remarks ................................... 183 Bibliography ......................................... 188 1. Introduction In 1900, at a time when his international prominence as a leading mathema- tician was just becoming firmly established, DAVID HILBERT (1862--1943) de- livered one of the central invited lectures at the Second International Congress of Mathematicians, held in Paris. The lecture bore the title "Mathematical Problems". At this very significant opportunity HILBERT attempted to "lift the veil" and peer into the development of mathematics of the century that http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archive for History of Exact Sciences Springer Journals

David Hilbert and the axiomatization of physics (1894–1905)

Archive for History of Exact Sciences , Volume 51 (2) – Sep 9, 2004

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References (205)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Mathematics; History of Mathematical Sciences; Philosophy of Science; History of Science; Mathematics, general; Astronomy, Observations and Techniques; History and Philosophical Foundations of Physics
ISSN
0003-9519
eISSN
1432-0657
DOI
10.1007/BF00375141
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Arch. Hist. Exact Sci. 51 (1997) 83-198. 9 Springer-Verlag 1997 David Hilbert and the Axiomatization of Physics (1894-1905) LEO CORRY Communicated by J. NORTON Contents 1. Introduction .......................................... 83 2. Hilbert as Student and Teacher ............................ 85 3. The Background to Hilbert's Axiomatic Approach: Geometry and Physics 89 4. Axiomatics, Geometry and Physics in Hilbert's Early Lectures ........ 104 5. Grundlagen der Geometrie ................................. 109 6. The Frege-Hilbert Correspondence .......................... 116 7. The 1900 List of Problems .............................. 119 8. Hilbert's 1905 Lectures on the Axiomatic Method ................ 123 Arithmetic and Geometry ............................... 125 Mechanics ......................................... 131 Thermodynamics ..................................... 148 Probability Calculus ................................... 158 Kinetic Theory of Gases ................................ 162 Insurance Mathematics ................................. 171 Electrodynamics ..................................... 172 Psychophysics ....................................... 179 9. Concluding Remarks ................................... 183 Bibliography ......................................... 188 1. Introduction In 1900, at a time when his international prominence as a leading mathema- tician was just becoming firmly established, DAVID HILBERT (1862--1943) de- livered one of the central invited lectures at the Second International Congress of Mathematicians, held in Paris. The lecture bore the title "Mathematical Problems". At this very significant opportunity HILBERT attempted to "lift the veil" and peer into the development of mathematics of the century that

Journal

Archive for History of Exact SciencesSpringer Journals

Published: Sep 9, 2004

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