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Enhancing the Quality of Life of People with Intellectual DisabilitiesThe Quality of Life of Disabled Children

Enhancing the Quality of Life of People with Intellectual Disabilities: The Quality of Life of... [In this chapter I discuss two dominant approaches to thinking about and measuring the quality of life or well-being of disabled children (social indicators of living conditions compared with psychological indicators of well-being). I then present three examples of the use of social indicators to illustrate the nature and level of material and social disadvantage faced by disabled children when compared with their non-disabled peers. These examples focus on: (1) changes in the quality of life of disabled Australian children (age 0–14); (2) the quality of life of very young children in the UK who are at risk of disability; (3) the quality of life of young disabled children in Bangladesh, Macedonia, Mongolia and Thailand. I conclude by highlighting some of the pragmatic and conceptual implications of adopting one of these dominant approaches to conceptualizing the quality of life of disabled children.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Enhancing the Quality of Life of People with Intellectual DisabilitiesThe Quality of Life of Disabled Children

Part of the Social Indicators Research Series Book Series (volume 41)
Editors: Kober, Ralph

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References (62)

Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011
ISBN
978-90-481-9649-4
Pages
223 –237
DOI
10.1007/978-90-481-9650-0_14
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[In this chapter I discuss two dominant approaches to thinking about and measuring the quality of life or well-being of disabled children (social indicators of living conditions compared with psychological indicators of well-being). I then present three examples of the use of social indicators to illustrate the nature and level of material and social disadvantage faced by disabled children when compared with their non-disabled peers. These examples focus on: (1) changes in the quality of life of disabled Australian children (age 0–14); (2) the quality of life of very young children in the UK who are at risk of disability; (3) the quality of life of young disabled children in Bangladesh, Macedonia, Mongolia and Thailand. I conclude by highlighting some of the pragmatic and conceptual implications of adopting one of these dominant approaches to conceptualizing the quality of life of disabled children.]

Published: Aug 5, 2010

Keywords: Cerebral Palsy; Social Indicator; Disable People; Disable Child; Income Poverty

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