Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Evaluating a Degree Qualification in Youth Work: A Qualitative Aotearoa New Zealand Study

Evaluating a Degree Qualification in Youth Work: A Qualitative Aotearoa New Zealand Study Traditionally, youth work has been based on volunteerism or as a casual and low paid occupation. However, there is an increasing call for credentialing and professionalisation in the youth work sector, which in turn led one New Zealand community polytechnic (tertiary community college) to introduce a bachelor’s degree, the Bachelor in Youth Development, (BYD) in 2011. This research study aimed to explore a sample of graduates’ experiences of the BYD and the benefits of accruing the qualification in their working lives. The following research question guided the study, “how did the BYD impact on a sample of graduates’ perceptions of themselves as youth workers and understandings of the career?” A mixed-method approach, consisting of a survey and individual interviews, was selected; however, this paper solely reports the results of ten semi-structured interviews conducted with ten graduates. The participants included six females and four males, from a variety of ethnicities and graduating cohorts. The participants reported a shift in their self-perception as uneducated and unskilled employees, to competent learners and highly skilled workers. Obtaining the degree resulted in secure employment for the participants, while for some it led to promotion and higher study. Implications are that a degree-level youth work qualification may enhance one’s confidence and practice as a youth worker and lead to career progression. However, a societal shift in the understanding and value of the profession needs to occur if the qualification is going to be recognised and rewarded in the sector. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Youth Studies Springer Journals

Evaluating a Degree Qualification in Youth Work: A Qualitative Aotearoa New Zealand Study

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/evaluating-a-degree-qualification-in-youth-work-a-qualitative-aotearoa-z6vZdzRC49

References (33)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2022
ISSN
2204-9193
eISSN
2204-9207
DOI
10.1007/s43151-022-00077-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Traditionally, youth work has been based on volunteerism or as a casual and low paid occupation. However, there is an increasing call for credentialing and professionalisation in the youth work sector, which in turn led one New Zealand community polytechnic (tertiary community college) to introduce a bachelor’s degree, the Bachelor in Youth Development, (BYD) in 2011. This research study aimed to explore a sample of graduates’ experiences of the BYD and the benefits of accruing the qualification in their working lives. The following research question guided the study, “how did the BYD impact on a sample of graduates’ perceptions of themselves as youth workers and understandings of the career?” A mixed-method approach, consisting of a survey and individual interviews, was selected; however, this paper solely reports the results of ten semi-structured interviews conducted with ten graduates. The participants included six females and four males, from a variety of ethnicities and graduating cohorts. The participants reported a shift in their self-perception as uneducated and unskilled employees, to competent learners and highly skilled workers. Obtaining the degree resulted in secure employment for the participants, while for some it led to promotion and higher study. Implications are that a degree-level youth work qualification may enhance one’s confidence and practice as a youth worker and lead to career progression. However, a societal shift in the understanding and value of the profession needs to occur if the qualification is going to be recognised and rewarded in the sector.

Journal

Journal of Applied Youth StudiesSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 1, 2022

Keywords: Youth work training; Youth work; Youth worker; Professionalism; Cultural capital

There are no references for this article.