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Ewa Tabeau, Aneke van den Berg Jeths and Christopher Heathcote (eds.), Forecasting Mortality in Developed Countries: Insights from a statistical, demographic and epidemiological perspective

Ewa Tabeau, Aneke van den Berg Jeths and Christopher Heathcote (eds.), Forecasting Mortality in... 104 BOOK REVIEWS new having been extensively developed by Mark Montgomery and John Casterline over some years. Most of the material in the book has already been published in the journals, but the book provides a coherent synthesis of this material. Those who take a cultural-institutional approach to explanations of fertility decline are unlikely to feel too threatened by this book because, in this dimension, the book never extends much beyond the small number of women who constitute the target woman’s local network. There is no discussion of the cultural nature of these networks other than that the networks may be different for those in a market town setting compared to those in a village. A priori, family planning comes from somewhere and some people adopt it. The theory then explicates how others might then follow through the mechanism of a network. This would not be recognised as ‘’situating fertility” by those who take the cultural-institutional approach. A potential criticism of the book is that it focuses so heavily on the role of networks that demand theory itself and how it operates in given contexts is left largely untouched. The demand theory hypothesis that parents make decisions about having http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Population / Revue europ_enne de D_mographie Springer Journals

Ewa Tabeau, Aneke van den Berg Jeths and Christopher Heathcote (eds.), Forecasting Mortality in Developed Countries: Insights from a statistical, demographic and epidemiological perspective

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Social Sciences; Demography; Sociology, general; Human Geography; Population Economics; Public Finance; Methodology of the Social Sciences
ISSN
0168-6577
eISSN
1572-9885
DOI
10.1023/A:1022158203548
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

104 BOOK REVIEWS new having been extensively developed by Mark Montgomery and John Casterline over some years. Most of the material in the book has already been published in the journals, but the book provides a coherent synthesis of this material. Those who take a cultural-institutional approach to explanations of fertility decline are unlikely to feel too threatened by this book because, in this dimension, the book never extends much beyond the small number of women who constitute the target woman’s local network. There is no discussion of the cultural nature of these networks other than that the networks may be different for those in a market town setting compared to those in a village. A priori, family planning comes from somewhere and some people adopt it. The theory then explicates how others might then follow through the mechanism of a network. This would not be recognised as ‘’situating fertility” by those who take the cultural-institutional approach. A potential criticism of the book is that it focuses so heavily on the role of networks that demand theory itself and how it operates in given contexts is left largely untouched. The demand theory hypothesis that parents make decisions about having

Journal

European Journal of Population / Revue europ_enne de D_mographieSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 5, 2004

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