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From Grounding Metaphors to Technological Devices: A Call for Legitimacy in School Mathematics

From Grounding Metaphors to Technological Devices: A Call for Legitimacy in School Mathematics The mutual relationship between real objects and mathematical constructions is at the very base of studies concerned with making sense in mathematics. In this wider perspective recent research studies have been concerned with the cognitive roots of mathematical concepts. Human perception and movement and, more generally, interaction with space and time are recognized as being of crucial importance for knowledge construction. A new approach to the cognitive science of mathematics, based on the notion of ‘embodied cognition’ assumes that mathematics cannot be considered as mind free. Accordingly, mathematical concepts derive from the cognitive activities of subjects and are highly influenced by the body structure. This article reports some examples of teaching experiments based on body-related metaphors. Some of them are carried out by means of technological devices. A call for legitimacy in school mathematics is made, both for an embodied cognition perspective and for a related use of technology. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Educational Studies in Mathematics Springer Journals

From Grounding Metaphors to Technological Devices: A Call for Legitimacy in School Mathematics

Educational Studies in Mathematics , Volume 47 (3) – Oct 17, 2004

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References (21)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Education; Mathematics Education; Mathematics, general
ISSN
0013-1954
eISSN
1573-0816
DOI
10.1023/A:1015143318759
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The mutual relationship between real objects and mathematical constructions is at the very base of studies concerned with making sense in mathematics. In this wider perspective recent research studies have been concerned with the cognitive roots of mathematical concepts. Human perception and movement and, more generally, interaction with space and time are recognized as being of crucial importance for knowledge construction. A new approach to the cognitive science of mathematics, based on the notion of ‘embodied cognition’ assumes that mathematics cannot be considered as mind free. Accordingly, mathematical concepts derive from the cognitive activities of subjects and are highly influenced by the body structure. This article reports some examples of teaching experiments based on body-related metaphors. Some of them are carried out by means of technological devices. A call for legitimacy in school mathematics is made, both for an embodied cognition perspective and for a related use of technology.

Journal

Educational Studies in MathematicsSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 17, 2004

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