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Governing KnowledgeChange or Continuity in Higher Education Governance?

Governing Knowledge: Change or Continuity in Higher Education Governance? CHANGE OR CONTINUITY IN HIGHER EDUCATION GOVERNANCE? Lessons Drawn from Twenty Years of National Reforms in European Countries CHRISTINE MUSSELIN INTRODUCTION Determining whether change does or does not prevail over continuity is a classical question in sociology and political science. Higher education studies do not escape this recurrent questioning. In particular one can wonder how much change should be documented, what factors or dimensions should have been affected by change, which characteristics should change processes bear, for an analyst to be allowed to state that change indeed occurred. No simple answer can be given to these questions. Furthermore, depending on the focus chosen by the researcher – actors versus struc- tures, micro versus meso or macro levels, local versus national perspectives, long term versus short term perspectives, individual versus institutional settings, norms versus practices, etc. – the balance between change and continuity may be differ- ently assessed. A further difficulty results from the fact that change is not always radical and provoked by identified reforms but may also be incremental (Lindblom, 1959) when successive limited moves produce fairly profound change in the long run. Among the contributions which may help to cope with the “change or continu- ity’ issue, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Governing KnowledgeChange or Continuity in Higher Education Governance?

Part of the Higher Education Dynamics Book Series (volume 9)
Editors: Bleiklie, Ivar; Henkel, Mary
Governing Knowledge — Jan 1, 2005

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References (38)

Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
© Springer 2005
ISBN
978-1-4020-3489-3
Pages
65 –79
DOI
10.1007/1-4020-3504-7_5
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

CHANGE OR CONTINUITY IN HIGHER EDUCATION GOVERNANCE? Lessons Drawn from Twenty Years of National Reforms in European Countries CHRISTINE MUSSELIN INTRODUCTION Determining whether change does or does not prevail over continuity is a classical question in sociology and political science. Higher education studies do not escape this recurrent questioning. In particular one can wonder how much change should be documented, what factors or dimensions should have been affected by change, which characteristics should change processes bear, for an analyst to be allowed to state that change indeed occurred. No simple answer can be given to these questions. Furthermore, depending on the focus chosen by the researcher – actors versus struc- tures, micro versus meso or macro levels, local versus national perspectives, long term versus short term perspectives, individual versus institutional settings, norms versus practices, etc. – the balance between change and continuity may be differ- ently assessed. A further difficulty results from the fact that change is not always radical and provoked by identified reforms but may also be incremental (Lindblom, 1959) when successive limited moves produce fairly profound change in the long run. Among the contributions which may help to cope with the “change or continu- ity’ issue,

Published: Jan 1, 2005

Keywords: High Education System; High Education Policy; High Education Governance; European Countr

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