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“Gypsies” in European Literature and CultureRoma in Europe

“Gypsies” in European Literature and Culture: Roma in Europe [The Romani people arrived in the Balkans from Anatolia by the thirteenth century and in the Kingdom of Hungary around 1400 at the earliest. They were in Spain by 1425 and most countries of Continental Western Europe around this date, and in the British Isles by at least 1500. Their history prior to this, according to established “histories of the Gypsies,” is vague, except for some Byzantine references to a people called Athinggánoi1 or Atsingáni who were originally a sect of Persian mystics who appeared in Constantinople and the Byzantine Empire in the ninth century. Apparently, their name was later applied to the proto-Roma who appeared in this area in the latter eleventh century or early twelfth century because both groups were nomadic and practiced “occult arts .”2] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

“Gypsies” in European Literature and CultureRoma in Europe

Editors: Glajar, Valentina; Radulescu, Domnica

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References (25)

Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan US
Copyright
© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Nature America Inc. 2008
ISBN
978-1-349-37154-9
Pages
1 –28
DOI
10.1057/9780230611634_1
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[The Romani people arrived in the Balkans from Anatolia by the thirteenth century and in the Kingdom of Hungary around 1400 at the earliest. They were in Spain by 1425 and most countries of Continental Western Europe around this date, and in the British Isles by at least 1500. Their history prior to this, according to established “histories of the Gypsies,” is vague, except for some Byzantine references to a people called Athinggánoi1 or Atsingáni who were originally a sect of Persian mystics who appeared in Constantinople and the Byzantine Empire in the ninth century. Apparently, their name was later applied to the proto-Roma who appeared in this area in the latter eleventh century or early twelfth century because both groups were nomadic and practiced “occult arts .”2]

Published: Oct 13, 2015

Keywords: European Union; Geneva Convention; Communist Country; National Minority; Open Society Institute

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