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Handbook of Social Indicators and Quality of Life Research“Failed” and “Failing” States: Is Quality of Life Possible?

Handbook of Social Indicators and Quality of Life Research: “Failed” and “Failing” States: Is... [Failed and failing states are sovereign political entities that are unable to provide for the basic security, geographic integrity, social justice, and material needs of their populations, for example, Afghanistan, Burkina-Faso, Burma/Myanmar, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Mexico, Somalia, Sudan, and Uganda. State-directed violence tends to be high in such states as does the number of internally and externally displaced persons. Depending on their level of social deterioration, failed and failing states may or may not be recognized as competent political entities by the world community which, often, is called upon to provide increasingly higher levels of military assistance and humanitarian aid to enable countries on the brink of social implosion to perform as least some of their most critical political, legal, and social welfare functions. In 2010, Foreign Policy magazine and the Fund for Peace identified 37 countries worldwide as either “failed” or “failing” states on the brink of social implosion. This chapter explores the extent and conditions under which at least some of the world’s most socially vulnerable states are able to secure at least a minimum level of quality of life for a portion of its population. The analysis draws on both the Fund for Peace’s Failed States Index and the author’s fully established Weighted Index of Social Progress. A working agenda for helping failed states regain some semblance of political integrity and progressively higher levels of quality of life is suggested.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Handbook of Social Indicators and Quality of Life Research“Failed” and “Failing” States: Is Quality of Life Possible?

Editors: Land, Kenneth C.; Michalos, Alex C.; Sirgy, M. Joseph

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References (56)

Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012
ISBN
978-94-007-2420-4
Pages
555 –580
DOI
10.1007/978-94-007-2421-1_26
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[Failed and failing states are sovereign political entities that are unable to provide for the basic security, geographic integrity, social justice, and material needs of their populations, for example, Afghanistan, Burkina-Faso, Burma/Myanmar, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Mexico, Somalia, Sudan, and Uganda. State-directed violence tends to be high in such states as does the number of internally and externally displaced persons. Depending on their level of social deterioration, failed and failing states may or may not be recognized as competent political entities by the world community which, often, is called upon to provide increasingly higher levels of military assistance and humanitarian aid to enable countries on the brink of social implosion to perform as least some of their most critical political, legal, and social welfare functions. In 2010, Foreign Policy magazine and the Fund for Peace identified 37 countries worldwide as either “failed” or “failing” states on the brink of social implosion. This chapter explores the extent and conditions under which at least some of the world’s most socially vulnerable states are able to secure at least a minimum level of quality of life for a portion of its population. The analysis draws on both the Fund for Peace’s Failed States Index and the author’s fully established Weighted Index of Social Progress. A working agenda for helping failed states regain some semblance of political integrity and progressively higher levels of quality of life is suggested.]

Published: Nov 2, 2011

Keywords: State Failure; Former Soviet Union; Central African Republic; Capita Income Level; Political Indicator

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