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Happiness is the Wrong MetricCommunitarian Bioethics

Happiness is the Wrong Metric: Communitarian Bioethics [A communitarian approach to bioethics adds a core value to a field that is often more concerned with considerations of individual autonomy than with the common good. Some interpretations of liberalism put the needs of the patient over those of the community; authoritarian communitarianism privileges the needs of society over those of the patient. This chapter argues for responsive communitarianism, which starts by asserting that we face two conflicting core values, autonomy and the common good, and that neither should be a priori privileged. Responsive communitarianism does not seek to eliminate this conflict in values; rather, as the chapter outlines, it recommends principles and procedures that can be used to work out such a conflict. This discussion uses the debate in the United States over social justice and funding for entitlements as a case study to apply the values of communitarian bioethics, and finally urges policymakers to incorporate concern for the common good.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Happiness is the Wrong MetricCommunitarian Bioethics

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Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s) 2018. This book is an open access publication.
ISBN
978-3-319-69622-5
Pages
291 –302
DOI
10.1007/978-3-319-69623-2_19
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[A communitarian approach to bioethics adds a core value to a field that is often more concerned with considerations of individual autonomy than with the common good. Some interpretations of liberalism put the needs of the patient over those of the community; authoritarian communitarianism privileges the needs of society over those of the patient. This chapter argues for responsive communitarianism, which starts by asserting that we face two conflicting core values, autonomy and the common good, and that neither should be a priori privileged. Responsive communitarianism does not seek to eliminate this conflict in values; rather, as the chapter outlines, it recommends principles and procedures that can be used to work out such a conflict. This discussion uses the debate in the United States over social justice and funding for entitlements as a case study to apply the values of communitarian bioethics, and finally urges policymakers to incorporate concern for the common good.]

Published: Jan 9, 2018

Keywords: Communitarian Bioethics; Authoritarian Communitarianism; Moral Dialogue; Informal Social Control; Public Health Law

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