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Happiness is the Wrong MetricTransforming the Active Orientation

Happiness is the Wrong Metric: Transforming the Active Orientation [Human beings accepted for centuries that nature, the social world, and the self were given. During the Modern era they assumed that all these realms can be re-engineered due to science and tech. But recent evidence reveals a growing gap between the ambitions of those seeking to re-engineer the world and our true capabilities. This chapter traces the history of passive orientation toward nature, from Aristotle, to Marx, to post-war liberal politics. It argues ultimately that some have been overly optimistic about the potential of technology to engender more expansive affluence, and calls for a reconsideration of values for a “post-affluence society.” This chapter recalls the discussion of happiness in Part I and holds that by mobilizing science and technology under newly-refined ambitions, we can steer toward a healthier, more contented society—one that is economically stable, provides for its citizens, reduces harm to the environment, and garners stronger communities.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Happiness is the Wrong MetricTransforming the Active Orientation

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References (19)

Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s) 2018. This book is an open access publication.
ISBN
978-3-319-69622-5
Pages
279 –289
DOI
10.1007/978-3-319-69623-2_18
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[Human beings accepted for centuries that nature, the social world, and the self were given. During the Modern era they assumed that all these realms can be re-engineered due to science and tech. But recent evidence reveals a growing gap between the ambitions of those seeking to re-engineer the world and our true capabilities. This chapter traces the history of passive orientation toward nature, from Aristotle, to Marx, to post-war liberal politics. It argues ultimately that some have been overly optimistic about the potential of technology to engender more expansive affluence, and calls for a reconsideration of values for a “post-affluence society.” This chapter recalls the discussion of happiness in Part I and holds that by mobilizing science and technology under newly-refined ambitions, we can steer toward a healthier, more contented society—one that is economically stable, provides for its citizens, reduces harm to the environment, and garners stronger communities.]

Published: Jan 9, 2018

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