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Hepatocytes corrected by gene therapy are selected in vivo in a murine model of hereditary tyrosinaemia type I

Hepatocytes corrected by gene therapy are selected in vivo in a murine model of hereditary... Current strategies for hepatic gene therapy are either quantitatively inefficient or suffer from lack of permanent gene expression. We have utilized an animal model of hereditary tyrosinaemia type I (HT1), a recessive liver disease caused by deficiency of fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH), to determine whether in vivo selection of corrected hepatocytes could improve the efficiency of liver gene transfer. As few as 1,000 transplanted wild-type hepatocytes were able to repopulate mutant liver, demonstrating their strong competitive growth advantage. Mutant hepatocytes corrected in situ by retroviral gene transfer were also positively selected. In mutant animals treated by multiple retrovirus injections >90% of hepatocytes became FAH positive and liver function was restored to normal. Our results demonstrate that in vivo selection is a useful strategy for hepatic gene therapy and may lead to effective treatment of human HT1 by retroviral gene transfer http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nature Genetics Springer Journals

Hepatocytes corrected by gene therapy are selected in vivo in a murine model of hereditary tyrosinaemia type I

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References (53)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 by Nature Publishing Group
Subject
Biomedicine; Biomedicine, general; Human Genetics; Cancer Research; Agriculture; Gene Function; Animal Genetics and Genomics
ISSN
1061-4036
eISSN
1546-1718
DOI
10.1038/ng0396-266
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Current strategies for hepatic gene therapy are either quantitatively inefficient or suffer from lack of permanent gene expression. We have utilized an animal model of hereditary tyrosinaemia type I (HT1), a recessive liver disease caused by deficiency of fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH), to determine whether in vivo selection of corrected hepatocytes could improve the efficiency of liver gene transfer. As few as 1,000 transplanted wild-type hepatocytes were able to repopulate mutant liver, demonstrating their strong competitive growth advantage. Mutant hepatocytes corrected in situ by retroviral gene transfer were also positively selected. In mutant animals treated by multiple retrovirus injections >90% of hepatocytes became FAH positive and liver function was restored to normal. Our results demonstrate that in vivo selection is a useful strategy for hepatic gene therapy and may lead to effective treatment of human HT1 by retroviral gene transfer

Journal

Nature GeneticsSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 1, 1996

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