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Idioms of Distress Revisited

Idioms of Distress Revisited Cult Med Psychiatry (2010) 34:401–416 DOI 10.1007/s11013-010-9179-6 COMME NTARY Mark Nichter Published online: 22 May 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010 I am pleased to have this opportunity to offer some reflections on what I have foreseen as an idioms-of-distress research agendum, and some thoughts on what an idioms-of-distress assessment adds to anthropological research on human suffering and culturally informed therapy facilitation in clinical settings. The term idioms of distress has now been in circulation for 30 years and has clearly taken on a life of its own. It was used in DSM IV and is likely to be considered for use in DSM V. A point of discussion in psychiatry at the moment is whether idioms of distress and ‘‘culture syndromes’’ are redundant terms or whether they refer to different phenomena. I weigh in on this issue as well as address two critiques of the way the term idioms of distress has been conceptualized by some scholars. I suggest that a distinction among idioms of distress, cultural idioms of distress and cultural syndromes is warranted. And I suggest that the two critiques of idioms of distress reviewed are necessary correctives, returning us to the original intent of an http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png "Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry" Springer Journals

Idioms of Distress Revisited

"Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry" , Volume 34 (2) – May 22, 2010

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References (91)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC
Subject
Social Sciences; Anthropology; Public Health; Psychiatry; Sociology, general; Clinical Psychology
ISSN
0165-005X
eISSN
1573-076X
DOI
10.1007/s11013-010-9179-6
pmid
20495999
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Cult Med Psychiatry (2010) 34:401–416 DOI 10.1007/s11013-010-9179-6 COMME NTARY Mark Nichter Published online: 22 May 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010 I am pleased to have this opportunity to offer some reflections on what I have foreseen as an idioms-of-distress research agendum, and some thoughts on what an idioms-of-distress assessment adds to anthropological research on human suffering and culturally informed therapy facilitation in clinical settings. The term idioms of distress has now been in circulation for 30 years and has clearly taken on a life of its own. It was used in DSM IV and is likely to be considered for use in DSM V. A point of discussion in psychiatry at the moment is whether idioms of distress and ‘‘culture syndromes’’ are redundant terms or whether they refer to different phenomena. I weigh in on this issue as well as address two critiques of the way the term idioms of distress has been conceptualized by some scholars. I suggest that a distinction among idioms of distress, cultural idioms of distress and cultural syndromes is warranted. And I suggest that the two critiques of idioms of distress reviewed are necessary correctives, returning us to the original intent of an

Journal

"Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry"Springer Journals

Published: May 22, 2010

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