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Impact of Presession Access to Toys Maintaining Challenging Behavior on Functional Communication Training: a Single Case Study

Impact of Presession Access to Toys Maintaining Challenging Behavior on Functional Communication... We implemented functional communication training (FCT) with a child with Pervasive Developmental Disorder-Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS) who exhibited challenging behavior when preferred toys were removed. Prior to FCT sessions the participant was exposed to 15 min of access to the toys that maintained challenging behavior versus no access. The presession access versus no access conditions were systematically evaluated using an alternating treatments design. Results indicate that presession access to the toys was associated with a decrease in challenging behavior and an increase in independent communication during FCT training. Future research should attempt to replicate these procedures with other participants who exhibit challenging behavior. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Developmental and Physical Disabilities Springer Journals

Impact of Presession Access to Toys Maintaining Challenging Behavior on Functional Communication Training: a Single Case Study

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References (15)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC
Subject
Psychology; Child and School Psychology; Public Health; Pediatrics
ISSN
1056-263X
eISSN
1573-3580
DOI
10.1007/s10882-009-9158-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We implemented functional communication training (FCT) with a child with Pervasive Developmental Disorder-Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS) who exhibited challenging behavior when preferred toys were removed. Prior to FCT sessions the participant was exposed to 15 min of access to the toys that maintained challenging behavior versus no access. The presession access versus no access conditions were systematically evaluated using an alternating treatments design. Results indicate that presession access to the toys was associated with a decrease in challenging behavior and an increase in independent communication during FCT training. Future research should attempt to replicate these procedures with other participants who exhibit challenging behavior.

Journal

Journal of Developmental and Physical DisabilitiesSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 6, 2009

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