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Individualism, Decadence and GlobalizationDecadent Interiority and the Will

Individualism, Decadence and Globalization: Decadent Interiority and the Will [The modern roots of Decadence as a relationship of parts or extremities to the whole were in 1830s American Gothic and British Aestheticism. Edgar Allan Poe elevated disease, perversity, and decay to new heights of artistic expression. Although Poe’s succcess in the United States was trivial until he was discovered by Charles Baudelaire, his perversity and Alfred Tennyson’s celebrity — in the words of the latter’s Ulysses “I am become a name” — were the two touchstones of decadence: the naturalistic uniqueness of the individual psyche and the recognition of modern “brand” or personal commodification that would be central to modern individualism. Baudelaire took up the first in Les Fleurs du Mal, censored by the French state in 1857, and the latter in the figure of the Dandy in The Painter of Modern Life (1863). He had begun translating Poe (culminating in 5 volumes) in 1848, and thereby turned from Romantic nature to more fragmented urban perspectives and personalities.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Individualism, Decadence and GlobalizationDecadent Interiority and the Will

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References (9)

Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan UK
Copyright
© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 2010
ISBN
978-1-349-31995-4
Pages
87 –115
DOI
10.1057/9780230277540_4
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[The modern roots of Decadence as a relationship of parts or extremities to the whole were in 1830s American Gothic and British Aestheticism. Edgar Allan Poe elevated disease, perversity, and decay to new heights of artistic expression. Although Poe’s succcess in the United States was trivial until he was discovered by Charles Baudelaire, his perversity and Alfred Tennyson’s celebrity — in the words of the latter’s Ulysses “I am become a name” — were the two touchstones of decadence: the naturalistic uniqueness of the individual psyche and the recognition of modern “brand” or personal commodification that would be central to modern individualism. Baudelaire took up the first in Les Fleurs du Mal, censored by the French state in 1857, and the latter in the figure of the Dandy in The Painter of Modern Life (1863). He had begun translating Poe (culminating in 5 volumes) in 1848, and thereby turned from Romantic nature to more fragmented urban perspectives and personalities.]

Published: Nov 30, 2015

Keywords: Perfect Competition; Prussic Acid; Philosophical Anthropology; Sexual Impulse; Individual Psyche

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