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Introduction: `Mode 2' Revisited: The New Production of Knowledge

Introduction: `Mode 2' Revisited: The New Production of Knowledge HELGA NOWOTNY, PETER SCOTT and MICHAEL GIBBONS INTRODUCTION ‘Mode 2’ Revisited: The New Production of Knowledge Nine years ago, six authors published The New Production of Knowl- edge: The Dynamics of Science and Research in Contemporary Societies. Reviews were mixed. Some philosophers, historians, and sociologists of science regarded the argument in the book as either simplistic or banal (or perhaps both), while science policy analysts worried about the empirical evidence for the trends it identified (or argued that these trends were not new). However, the book’s broad thesis – that the production of knowledge and the process of research were being radically transformed – struck a chord of recognition among both researchers and policy-makers. Of course, like all theses that gain a certain popularity (and notoriety), this thesis was radically simplified, and collapsed into a single phrase – ‘Mode 2’. The old paradigm of scientific discovery (‘Mode 1’) – character- ized by the hegemony of theoretical or, at any rate, experimental science; by an internally-driven taxonomy of disciplines; and by the autonomy of scientists and their host institutions, the universities – was being super- seded by a new paradigm of knowledge production (‘Mode 2’), which was socially distributed, application-oriented, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Minerva Springer Journals

Introduction: `Mode 2' Revisited: The New Production of Knowledge

Minerva , Volume 41 (3) – Oct 7, 2004

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Social Sciences; Science and Technology Studies; Social Sciences, general; Higher Education
ISSN
0026-4695
eISSN
1573-1871
DOI
10.1023/A:1025505528250
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

HELGA NOWOTNY, PETER SCOTT and MICHAEL GIBBONS INTRODUCTION ‘Mode 2’ Revisited: The New Production of Knowledge Nine years ago, six authors published The New Production of Knowl- edge: The Dynamics of Science and Research in Contemporary Societies. Reviews were mixed. Some philosophers, historians, and sociologists of science regarded the argument in the book as either simplistic or banal (or perhaps both), while science policy analysts worried about the empirical evidence for the trends it identified (or argued that these trends were not new). However, the book’s broad thesis – that the production of knowledge and the process of research were being radically transformed – struck a chord of recognition among both researchers and policy-makers. Of course, like all theses that gain a certain popularity (and notoriety), this thesis was radically simplified, and collapsed into a single phrase – ‘Mode 2’. The old paradigm of scientific discovery (‘Mode 1’) – character- ized by the hegemony of theoretical or, at any rate, experimental science; by an internally-driven taxonomy of disciplines; and by the autonomy of scientists and their host institutions, the universities – was being super- seded by a new paradigm of knowledge production (‘Mode 2’), which was socially distributed, application-oriented,

Journal

MinervaSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 7, 2004

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