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Journalists, broadcasters, scientific experts and public opinion

Journalists, broadcasters, scientific experts and public opinion Journalists, Broadcasters, Scientific Experts and Public Opinion STANLEY ROTHMAN Ir~ THE DAYS of The Front Page--a play by Charles MacArthur and Ben Hecht, which was very popular in the United States half a century ago-- journalists, like most Americans, went to work after completing second- ary school, or even before. While some journalists and executives on leading papers were from upper-middle-class backgrounds, journalists were most often recruited from youths of working-class and lower- middle-class origins. The generally democratric sympathies of working reporters in the 1930s was partly a result of their social origins. The pattern changed after the Second World War. Increasing numbers of young men and women from upper-middle-class families began to seek employment in journalism and television as exciting and creative careers and as ways of influencing society. Nowadays journalists who work for the leading newspapers and broadcasting systems of the United States are far more likely than business men to have come from relatively affluent backgrounds, to have graduated from leading universities, and to be characterised by a collectivistic liberal and alienated cosmopolita n out- look/ Several colleagues and I found that 45 per cent of the staffs of leading organs of mass communication remember their http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Minerva Springer Journals

Journalists, broadcasters, scientific experts and public opinion

Minerva , Volume 28 (2) – Sep 28, 2005

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright
Subject
Social Sciences; Science and Technology Studies; Social Sciences, general; Higher Education
ISSN
0026-4695
eISSN
1573-1871
DOI
10.1007/BF02219656
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Journalists, Broadcasters, Scientific Experts and Public Opinion STANLEY ROTHMAN Ir~ THE DAYS of The Front Page--a play by Charles MacArthur and Ben Hecht, which was very popular in the United States half a century ago-- journalists, like most Americans, went to work after completing second- ary school, or even before. While some journalists and executives on leading papers were from upper-middle-class backgrounds, journalists were most often recruited from youths of working-class and lower- middle-class origins. The generally democratric sympathies of working reporters in the 1930s was partly a result of their social origins. The pattern changed after the Second World War. Increasing numbers of young men and women from upper-middle-class families began to seek employment in journalism and television as exciting and creative careers and as ways of influencing society. Nowadays journalists who work for the leading newspapers and broadcasting systems of the United States are far more likely than business men to have come from relatively affluent backgrounds, to have graduated from leading universities, and to be characterised by a collectivistic liberal and alienated cosmopolita n out- look/ Several colleagues and I found that 45 per cent of the staffs of leading organs of mass communication remember their

Journal

MinervaSpringer Journals

Published: Sep 28, 2005

There are no references for this article.