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Kairos, Crisis, and Global ApartheidAt the Heart of It All: Kairos, Apartheid, and the Calvinist Tradition

Kairos, Crisis, and Global Apartheid: At the Heart of It All: Kairos, Apartheid, and the... [“It is not enough,” says John Calvin in his commentary on Isaiah 58:6–7, “to abstain from acts of injustice, if you refuse your assistance to the needy.” In other words, it is not just about not doing injustice as if that is the fulfillment of God’s commandment, Calvin says. It is about two things: the undoing of injustice and the doing of justice. Moreover, it is not about those we find acceptable for some reason; it is about all God’s children, created in God’s image and therefore our flesh and blood:By commanding them to “break bread to the hungry,” God intended to take away every excuse from covetous and greedy men, who allege that they have a right to keep possession of that which is their own… And indeed, this is the dictate of common sense, that the hungry are deprived of their just right, if their hunger is not relieved… At length he concludes—And that you hide not yourself from your own flesh. Here we ought to observe the term flesh, by which he means all men universally, not a single one of whom we can behold, without seeing as in a mirror, “our own flesh”. It is therefore proof of the greatest inhumanity, to despise those in whom we are constrained to recognize our own flesh.1] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Kairos, Crisis, and Global ApartheidAt the Heart of It All: Kairos, Apartheid, and the Calvinist Tradition

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References (6)

Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan US
Copyright
© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Nature America Inc. 2015
ISBN
978-1-137-50309-1
Pages
39 –68
DOI
10.1057/9781137495310_3
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[“It is not enough,” says John Calvin in his commentary on Isaiah 58:6–7, “to abstain from acts of injustice, if you refuse your assistance to the needy.” In other words, it is not just about not doing injustice as if that is the fulfillment of God’s commandment, Calvin says. It is about two things: the undoing of injustice and the doing of justice. Moreover, it is not about those we find acceptable for some reason; it is about all God’s children, created in God’s image and therefore our flesh and blood:By commanding them to “break bread to the hungry,” God intended to take away every excuse from covetous and greedy men, who allege that they have a right to keep possession of that which is their own… And indeed, this is the dictate of common sense, that the hungry are deprived of their just right, if their hunger is not relieved… At length he concludes—And that you hide not yourself from your own flesh. Here we ought to observe the term flesh, by which he means all men universally, not a single one of whom we can behold, without seeing as in a mirror, “our own flesh”. It is therefore proof of the greatest inhumanity, to despise those in whom we are constrained to recognize our own flesh.1]

Published: Dec 20, 2015

Keywords: Apartheid Regime; Liberation Theology; Civil Authority; Oppressed People; South African Council

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