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LegitimacyConflicting Loyalties and Legitimate Illegality in Urban South Lebanon

Legitimacy: Conflicting Loyalties and Legitimate Illegality in Urban South Lebanon [Drawing on field research in Tyre, Mollica addresses conflicting loyalties and legitimate illegality. In the Lebanon, the idea of a ‘co-cultural’ architecture does not work because the electorate acts, and votes, according to ethno-religious interests. Hezbollah—a political legal entity and a paramilitary illegal entity—does much illegal policing and enjoys legitimacy within and without the local community. Its (illegal) use of power is not seriously challenged by legal powers—the Lebanese Army and the peacekeeping United Nations Interim Forces in Lebanon—that cannot guarantee the security of the religious community. This ethnography raises questions on the definition of ‘citizenship’, as belonging is conceptualized by reference not to the nation state but to (religiously defined) groups, acting in an (ethno-religiously defined) area to pursue (ethno-religiously defined) interests.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

LegitimacyConflicting Loyalties and Legitimate Illegality in Urban South Lebanon

Editors: Pardo, Italo; Prato, Giuliana B.
Legitimacy — Oct 18, 2018

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References (18)

Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s) 2019
ISBN
978-3-319-96237-5
Pages
259 –279
DOI
10.1007/978-3-319-96238-2_12
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[Drawing on field research in Tyre, Mollica addresses conflicting loyalties and legitimate illegality. In the Lebanon, the idea of a ‘co-cultural’ architecture does not work because the electorate acts, and votes, according to ethno-religious interests. Hezbollah—a political legal entity and a paramilitary illegal entity—does much illegal policing and enjoys legitimacy within and without the local community. Its (illegal) use of power is not seriously challenged by legal powers—the Lebanese Army and the peacekeeping United Nations Interim Forces in Lebanon—that cannot guarantee the security of the religious community. This ethnography raises questions on the definition of ‘citizenship’, as belonging is conceptualized by reference not to the nation state but to (religiously defined) groups, acting in an (ethno-religiously defined) area to pursue (ethno-religiously defined) interests.]

Published: Oct 18, 2018

Keywords: South Lebanon; Hezbollah; Lebanese Armed Forces; United Nations Interim Force In Lebanon (UNIFIL); United Nations High Commissioner For Refugees (UNHCR)

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