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Local History, Transnational Memory in the Romanian HolocaustNorman Manea: “I am not a Writer of the Holocaust”

Local History, Transnational Memory in the Romanian Holocaust: Norman Manea: “I am not a Writer... [In 1971, Norman Manea was shocked when he discovered his name in Jewish Writers of Romanian Language, a Hebrew anthology published in Israel (Petreu 1992, 7). At that time he considered himself simply a Romanian writer, without any connection to a specific ethnicity. His Jewishness, which he never proclaimed or denied, was strictly a private matter. Although he alluded to the Holocaust in fiction (in some short stories of October 8 O’Clock, for instance), he strongly emphasized that the Shoah was not the main focus of his writing: “I am not what we call a ‘Writer of the Holocaust’… Neither do I believe in this thematic “specialty” which is practiced, quite successfully, by some writers” (Bogaart 1988). Things gradually changed, however, as he acknowledged in several interviews (e.g., Cugno, 1995 “Vieţuire şi supravieţuire”), he realized that his Jewishness was inescapable and openly recognized the importance of ethnicity in his writing (see Casa melcului). His latest memoir marks a definite shift from intimations of his experience to a complete and straightforward analysis of his identity as shaped by tragic personal events in Romania.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Local History, Transnational Memory in the Romanian HolocaustNorman Manea: “I am not a Writer of the Holocaust”

Editors: Glajar, Valentina; Teodorescu, Jeanine

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References (5)

Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan US
Copyright
© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Nature America Inc. 2011
ISBN
978-1-349-29451-0
Pages
175 –194
DOI
10.1057/9780230118416_10
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[In 1971, Norman Manea was shocked when he discovered his name in Jewish Writers of Romanian Language, a Hebrew anthology published in Israel (Petreu 1992, 7). At that time he considered himself simply a Romanian writer, without any connection to a specific ethnicity. His Jewishness, which he never proclaimed or denied, was strictly a private matter. Although he alluded to the Holocaust in fiction (in some short stories of October 8 O’Clock, for instance), he strongly emphasized that the Shoah was not the main focus of his writing: “I am not what we call a ‘Writer of the Holocaust’… Neither do I believe in this thematic “specialty” which is practiced, quite successfully, by some writers” (Bogaart 1988). Things gradually changed, however, as he acknowledged in several interviews (e.g., Cugno, 1995 “Vieţuire şi supravieţuire”), he realized that his Jewishness was inescapable and openly recognized the importance of ethnicity in his writing (see Casa melcului). His latest memoir marks a definite shift from intimations of his experience to a complete and straightforward analysis of his identity as shaped by tragic personal events in Romania.]

Published: Oct 18, 2015

Keywords: Jewish Identity; Labor Camp; Romanian Culture; Romanian Society; Imaginary Dialogue

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