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Medieval Afterlives in Popular CultureIntroduction: Now and Then

Medieval Afterlives in Popular Culture: Introduction: Now and Then [On March 10, 2012 Robert Hardman’s “How I See It” column for The Daily Mail purported to explore the resurgent division between the UK and Argentina over sovereignty of the Falkland Islands. As ever, the clue was in the title, “The Empire Strikes Back,” itself a striking glimpse of the intersection of popular culture and nation-state politics stirred by British tabloid press. Hardman’s inflammatory rhetoric decried those who, in his view, pander to suggestions that Britain is “behaving like the old imperial power it no longer is.” His hit list included a former Commonwealth president, the Argentinian government, and several celebrities: the US actor and director Sean Penn; a “misquoted” Roger Waters of the band Pink Floyd; and Morrissey, formerly front man of The Smiths who, while performing onstage in Argentina, allegedly declared that the Falkland islands belong “to you”—a statement, Hardman opined, designed to feed an Argentinian sense of outrage as “the plucky victim of British imperialism rather than the beaten bully boy of 1982.”1] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Medieval Afterlives in Popular CultureIntroduction: Now and Then

Part of the The New Middle Ages Book Series
Editors: Ashton, Gail; Kline, Daniel T.

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References (1)

Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan US
Copyright
© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Nature America Inc. 2012
ISBN
978-1-349-34085-9
Pages
1 –12
DOI
10.1057/9781137105172_1
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[On March 10, 2012 Robert Hardman’s “How I See It” column for The Daily Mail purported to explore the resurgent division between the UK and Argentina over sovereignty of the Falkland Islands. As ever, the clue was in the title, “The Empire Strikes Back,” itself a striking glimpse of the intersection of popular culture and nation-state politics stirred by British tabloid press. Hardman’s inflammatory rhetoric decried those who, in his view, pander to suggestions that Britain is “behaving like the old imperial power it no longer is.” His hit list included a former Commonwealth president, the Argentinian government, and several celebrities: the US actor and director Sean Penn; a “misquoted” Roger Waters of the band Pink Floyd; and Morrissey, formerly front man of The Smiths who, while performing onstage in Argentina, allegedly declared that the Falkland islands belong “to you”—a statement, Hardman opined, designed to feed an Argentinian sense of outrage as “the plucky victim of British imperialism rather than the beaten bully boy of 1982.”1]

Published: Nov 6, 2015

Keywords: Popular Culture; Falkland Island; Daily Mail; Commonwealth President; Canterbury Tale

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