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Men matter: Additive and interactive gendered preferences and reproductive behavior in kenya

Men matter: Additive and interactive gendered preferences and reproductive behavior in kenya The extent of men’s roles in reproductive decision-making in Africa is a subject of contention. Despite the volume of work on the roles men play in fertility decisions, there have been few attempts to derive direct empirical estimates of the effect of men’s preferences on reproductive behavior. I employ 1989 and 1993 Kenya Demographic and Health Surveys to examine the relative roles of the reproductive preferences of males and females on contraceptive use. Additive and interactive measures of preferences document a significant effect of men’s preferences, which may eclipse women’s preferences. The implications of these findings are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Demography Springer Journals

Men matter: Additive and interactive gendered preferences and reproductive behavior in kenya

Demography , Volume 35 (2) – Jan 12, 2011

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References (72)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 by Population Association of America
Subject
Social Sciences, general; Demography; Sociology; Population Economics; Medicine/Public Health, general; Geography (general)
ISSN
0070-3370
eISSN
1533-7790
DOI
10.2307/3004054
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The extent of men’s roles in reproductive decision-making in Africa is a subject of contention. Despite the volume of work on the roles men play in fertility decisions, there have been few attempts to derive direct empirical estimates of the effect of men’s preferences on reproductive behavior. I employ 1989 and 1993 Kenya Demographic and Health Surveys to examine the relative roles of the reproductive preferences of males and females on contraceptive use. Additive and interactive measures of preferences document a significant effect of men’s preferences, which may eclipse women’s preferences. The implications of these findings are discussed.

Journal

DemographySpringer Journals

Published: Jan 12, 2011

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