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Molecular detection and diversity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria isolated from geographically diverse sites

Molecular detection and diversity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria isolated... Nineteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading bacteria were isolated from environmental samples in Kuwait, Indonesia, Thailand, and Japan by enrichment with either naphthalene or phenanthrene as a sole carbon source. Sequence analyses of the 16-S rRNA gene indicated that at least seven genera (Ralstonia, Sphingomonas, Burkholderia, Pseudomonas, Comamonas, Flavobacterium, and Bacillus) were present in this collection. Determination of the ability of the isolates to use PAH and its presumed catabolic intermediates suggests that the isolates showed multiple phenotypes in terms of utilization and degradation pathways. The large subunit of the terminal oxygenase gene (phnAc) from Burkholderia sp. strain RP007 hybridized to 32% (6/19) of the isolates, whilst gene probing using the large subunit of terminal oxygenase gene (pahAc) from Pseudomonas putida strain OUS82 revealed no pahAc-like genes amongst the isolates. Using three degenerated primer sets (pPAH-F/NR700, AJ025/26, and RieskeF/R), targeting a conserved region with the genes encoding the large subunit of terminal oxygenase successfully amplified material from 6 additional PAH-degrading isolates. Sequence analyses showed that the large subunit of terminal oxygenase in 4 isolates was highly homologous to the large subunit of naphthalene dioxygenase gene from Ralstonia sp. strain U2. However, we could not obtain any information on the oxygenase system involved in the naphthalene and/or phenathrene degradation by 7 other strains. These results suggest that PAH-degrading bacteria are diverse, and that there are still many unidentified PAH-degrading bacteria. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology Springer Journals

Molecular detection and diversity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria isolated from geographically diverse sites

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References (30)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Life Sciences; Microbiology; Microbial Genetics and Genomics; Biotechnology
ISSN
0175-7598
eISSN
1432-0614
DOI
10.1007/s00253-001-0880-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Nineteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading bacteria were isolated from environmental samples in Kuwait, Indonesia, Thailand, and Japan by enrichment with either naphthalene or phenanthrene as a sole carbon source. Sequence analyses of the 16-S rRNA gene indicated that at least seven genera (Ralstonia, Sphingomonas, Burkholderia, Pseudomonas, Comamonas, Flavobacterium, and Bacillus) were present in this collection. Determination of the ability of the isolates to use PAH and its presumed catabolic intermediates suggests that the isolates showed multiple phenotypes in terms of utilization and degradation pathways. The large subunit of the terminal oxygenase gene (phnAc) from Burkholderia sp. strain RP007 hybridized to 32% (6/19) of the isolates, whilst gene probing using the large subunit of terminal oxygenase gene (pahAc) from Pseudomonas putida strain OUS82 revealed no pahAc-like genes amongst the isolates. Using three degenerated primer sets (pPAH-F/NR700, AJ025/26, and RieskeF/R), targeting a conserved region with the genes encoding the large subunit of terminal oxygenase successfully amplified material from 6 additional PAH-degrading isolates. Sequence analyses showed that the large subunit of terminal oxygenase in 4 isolates was highly homologous to the large subunit of naphthalene dioxygenase gene from Ralstonia sp. strain U2. However, we could not obtain any information on the oxygenase system involved in the naphthalene and/or phenathrene degradation by 7 other strains. These results suggest that PAH-degrading bacteria are diverse, and that there are still many unidentified PAH-degrading bacteria.

Journal

Applied Microbiology and BiotechnologySpringer Journals

Published: Jan 4, 2002

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