Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Non-University Higher Education in EuropeQuestioning the Binary Divide: Non-University Higher Education in Flanders (Belgium)

Non-University Higher Education in Europe: Questioning the Binary Divide: Non-University Higher... [In this paper, I will show how the government created a framework to bring universities and colleges closer to each other, and thus cast the binary divide into question. Although the first few steps in this process had already been taken in the College Decree in 1994, this process was more stimulated by the Bologna Process. Bologna, after all, stressed the internationalisation of higher education with its consequences for the structure of the curriculum and the titles of the diplomas. Within this process, new structures emerged (e.g. associations between universities and colleges), and special financing was provided for the academic upgrading of college curricula. A comparable financing system for universities and colleges was planned. Nevertheless, the binary divide is still present, which inspired VLHORA1 (2004b) to formulate a four-page list of demands to the new Flemish government in July, 2004, in order to bridge this divide. One of these demands was the right to translate hogeschool into the English word “university”, if only in their international contacts. The road of the colleges into the academic world will be described here in four sections. First, I will take a look at the structure of the colleges; second, I will give a picture of their governing structure; third, I will discuss their level of autonomy; and fourth, I will highlight their future development and challenges.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Non-University Higher Education in EuropeQuestioning the Binary Divide: Non-University Higher Education in Flanders (Belgium)

Part of the Higher Education Dynamics Book Series (volume 23)
Editors: Taylor, James S.; Ferreira, José Brites; Machado, Maria de Lourdes; Santiago, Rui

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/non-university-higher-education-in-europe-questioning-the-binary-V0IN7Z8O98

References (30)

Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
© Springer Netherlands 2008
ISBN
978-1-4020-8334-1
Pages
43 –75
DOI
10.1007/978-1-4020-8335-8_3
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[In this paper, I will show how the government created a framework to bring universities and colleges closer to each other, and thus cast the binary divide into question. Although the first few steps in this process had already been taken in the College Decree in 1994, this process was more stimulated by the Bologna Process. Bologna, after all, stressed the internationalisation of higher education with its consequences for the structure of the curriculum and the titles of the diplomas. Within this process, new structures emerged (e.g. associations between universities and colleges), and special financing was provided for the academic upgrading of college curricula. A comparable financing system for universities and colleges was planned. Nevertheless, the binary divide is still present, which inspired VLHORA1 (2004b) to formulate a four-page list of demands to the new Flemish government in July, 2004, in order to bridge this divide. One of these demands was the right to translate hogeschool into the English word “university”, if only in their international contacts. The road of the colleges into the academic world will be described here in four sections. First, I will take a look at the structure of the colleges; second, I will give a picture of their governing structure; third, I will discuss their level of autonomy; and fourth, I will highlight their future development and challenges.]

Published: Jan 1, 2008

Keywords: High Education; General Manager; College Teacher; Teaching Staff; Academic Freedom

There are no references for this article.