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Outlaw Motorcycle Clubs and Street GangsLegalization by Commodification: The (Ir)relevance of Fashion Styles and Brands in Street Gangster Performance

Outlaw Motorcycle Clubs and Street Gangs: Legalization by Commodification: The (Ir)relevance of... [Throughout the history of gang ethnography, particular dress codes and fashion styles have always been perceived as representations of gang culture. However, since its beginning, many young men enjoyed gang fashion without ‘being’ a gang member. Today, an ever-growing global fashion industry transforms street styles into commodities which are sold to and consumed by a much wider audience than ‘the streets’ inhabitants. This endows street styles, and in this chapter gang fashion, with a semantic ambiguity. While keeping its criminal connotations, gang aesthetics are normalized in the commodification process. This process enables, for instance, consumers of gangsta rap to enjoy gang fashion, but the semantic ambiguity also renders ‘true’ gangster performance more difficult.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Outlaw Motorcycle Clubs and Street GangsLegalization by Commodification: The (Ir)relevance of Fashion Styles and Brands in Street Gangster Performance

Editors: Kuldova, Tereza; Sánchez-Jankowski, Martín

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References (30)

Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s) 2018
ISBN
978-3-319-76119-0
Pages
45 –68
DOI
10.1007/978-3-319-76120-6_3
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[Throughout the history of gang ethnography, particular dress codes and fashion styles have always been perceived as representations of gang culture. However, since its beginning, many young men enjoyed gang fashion without ‘being’ a gang member. Today, an ever-growing global fashion industry transforms street styles into commodities which are sold to and consumed by a much wider audience than ‘the streets’ inhabitants. This endows street styles, and in this chapter gang fashion, with a semantic ambiguity. While keeping its criminal connotations, gang aesthetics are normalized in the commodification process. This process enables, for instance, consumers of gangsta rap to enjoy gang fashion, but the semantic ambiguity also renders ‘true’ gangster performance more difficult.]

Published: Apr 26, 2018

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