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Peace Psychology in the BalkansTransforming Violent Masculinities in Serbia and Beyond

Peace Psychology in the Balkans: Transforming Violent Masculinities in Serbia and Beyond [This chapter examines the gendered nature of physical acts of violence. The argument is made that physical violence is predominantly linked with a particular construction of masculinity in Serbia and beyond. These violent masculinities are in turn supported by cognitive templates that stem from patriarchy and are thus linked with structural, cultural and epistemological violence commonly practised even during times of negative peace. The chapter first defines the problem of violent masculinities and investigates their many and varied manifestations. Several theoretical frameworks are used to analyse these manifestations, such as feminist ­critique of a patriarchal cognitive framework and peace educators’ critique of pedagogical practices that prepare for and help justify violence. Furthermore, the Freudian concept of narcissistic injury, the Jungian concept of the shadow and the Stones’ ­concept of disowned selves are used to point out the psychological factors that may contribute to some men’s conscious or subconscious desire or decision to engage in acts of violence. Analysis of predominantly Serbian masculinities in the context of Yugoslav wars is offered as a case study; an example of (1) the interconnection between ­various forms of violence and (2) how broad theoretical frameworks could be used to analyse concrete manifestations of violence within a particular geo-historical context. The chapter concludes with a discussion on strategies and cognitive ­templates needed as a prerequisite in order to enhance and/or construct alternative non-violent oriented masculinities.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Peace Psychology in the BalkansTransforming Violent Masculinities in Serbia and Beyond

Part of the Peace Psychology Book Series Book Series
Editors: Simić, Olivera; Volčič, Zala; Philpot, Catherine R.

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References (28)

Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012
ISBN
978-1-4614-1947-1
Pages
57 –73
DOI
10.1007/978-1-4614-1948-8_4
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[This chapter examines the gendered nature of physical acts of violence. The argument is made that physical violence is predominantly linked with a particular construction of masculinity in Serbia and beyond. These violent masculinities are in turn supported by cognitive templates that stem from patriarchy and are thus linked with structural, cultural and epistemological violence commonly practised even during times of negative peace. The chapter first defines the problem of violent masculinities and investigates their many and varied manifestations. Several theoretical frameworks are used to analyse these manifestations, such as feminist ­critique of a patriarchal cognitive framework and peace educators’ critique of pedagogical practices that prepare for and help justify violence. Furthermore, the Freudian concept of narcissistic injury, the Jungian concept of the shadow and the Stones’ ­concept of disowned selves are used to point out the psychological factors that may contribute to some men’s conscious or subconscious desire or decision to engage in acts of violence. Analysis of predominantly Serbian masculinities in the context of Yugoslav wars is offered as a case study; an example of (1) the interconnection between ­various forms of violence and (2) how broad theoretical frameworks could be used to analyse concrete manifestations of violence within a particular geo-historical context. The chapter concludes with a discussion on strategies and cognitive ­templates needed as a prerequisite in order to enhance and/or construct alternative non-violent oriented masculinities.]

Published: Jan 31, 2012

Keywords: Gender; Performativity; Psychology; Masculinities; Violence; Peace

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