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Plant Propagation by Tissue CultureMicropropagation: Uses and Methods

Plant Propagation by Tissue Culture: Micropropagation: Uses and Methods Chapter 2 1. SEED VERSUS SOMA Plants can be propagated through their two populations of plants can result from seeds in three developmental life cycles; the sexual, or the asexual. ways: In the sexual cycle new plants arise after fusion of the • from inbred (homozygous) lines which can be parental gametes, and develop from zygotic embryos obtained in self-fertile (autogamous) species. contained within seeds or fruits. In most cases Examples of autogamous crops are wheat, barley, rice seedlings will be variable and each one will represent and tobacco. a new combination of genes, brought about during the • from F1 seeds produced by crossing two formation of gametes (meiotic cell division) and their homozygous parents. Besides being uniform, F1 sexual fusion. By contrast, in the vegetative (asexual) plants may also display hybrid vigour. F1 seeds of cycle the unique characteristics of any individual many flower producing ornamentals and vegetables plant selected for propagation (termed the mother are now available, but due to high production costs, plant, stock plant or ortet) are usually perpetuated they are expensive. because, during normal cell division (mitosis), genes • from apomictic seedlings. In a few genera, plants are typically copied exactly at each http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Plant Propagation by Tissue CultureMicropropagation: Uses and Methods

Editors: George, Edwin F.; Hall, Michael A.; Klerk, Geert-Jan De

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References (211)

Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
© springer 2008
ISBN
978-1-4020-5004-6
Pages
29 –64
DOI
10.1007/978-1-4020-5005-3_2
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

Chapter 2 1. SEED VERSUS SOMA Plants can be propagated through their two populations of plants can result from seeds in three developmental life cycles; the sexual, or the asexual. ways: In the sexual cycle new plants arise after fusion of the • from inbred (homozygous) lines which can be parental gametes, and develop from zygotic embryos obtained in self-fertile (autogamous) species. contained within seeds or fruits. In most cases Examples of autogamous crops are wheat, barley, rice seedlings will be variable and each one will represent and tobacco. a new combination of genes, brought about during the • from F1 seeds produced by crossing two formation of gametes (meiotic cell division) and their homozygous parents. Besides being uniform, F1 sexual fusion. By contrast, in the vegetative (asexual) plants may also display hybrid vigour. F1 seeds of cycle the unique characteristics of any individual many flower producing ornamentals and vegetables plant selected for propagation (termed the mother are now available, but due to high production costs, plant, stock plant or ortet) are usually perpetuated they are expensive. because, during normal cell division (mitosis), genes • from apomictic seedlings. In a few genera, plants are typically copied exactly at each

Published: Jan 1, 2008

Keywords: Somatic Embryo; Somatic Embryogenesis; Embryogenic Callus; Shoot Apex; Zygotic Embryo

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