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Proceedings of the Worldwide Music Conference 2021A Pilot-Study of Chinese Wind and String Instrumentalists’ Intonation

Proceedings of the Worldwide Music Conference 2021: A Pilot-Study of Chinese Wind and String... [Chinese music has a long and varied musical history, with a diversity of associated musical tuning systems and temperaments documented since antiquity. However, in the modern context, with the rise of the contemporary Chinese orchestra and western-influenced compositional harmonies, there is a need for an understanding of Chinese instrumentalists’ intonation practice and agreement. Accordingly, this study examines the intonation practices of Chinese performers. Seventeen expert instrumentalists (9 winds and 8 strings) were chosen and asked to perform 3 performance tasks in 2 musical keys, and the pitches (n = 1428) extracted. Results show a scale contour favouring a slightly flattened ‘Re’ (–2.8¢), raised ‘Mi’ (+1.8¢) and raised ‘Ti’ (+2.1¢), computed relative to equal temperament. Further, ‘Mi’ (SD =  ±7.9¢) and ‘Ti’ (SD =  ±8.7¢) differed consistently (and noticeably) amongst wind and string instrumentalists. Subtler traits were also observed, with winds preferring a somewhat raised ‘Fa’ (+2.1¢) while strings preferred pronounced ‘Mi’ (+4.6¢) and ‘Ti’ (+4.7¢). The effect due to different musical key and performance tasks were also analysed and found to have a subtly systematic but minimal effect on pitch consistency.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Proceedings of the Worldwide Music Conference 2021A Pilot-Study of Chinese Wind and String Instrumentalists’ Intonation

Part of the Current Research in Systematic Musicology Book Series (volume 8)
Editors: Khannanov, Ildar D.; Ruditsa, Roman

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References (21)

Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2021
ISBN
978-3-030-74038-2
Pages
113 –123
DOI
10.1007/978-3-030-74039-9_12
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[Chinese music has a long and varied musical history, with a diversity of associated musical tuning systems and temperaments documented since antiquity. However, in the modern context, with the rise of the contemporary Chinese orchestra and western-influenced compositional harmonies, there is a need for an understanding of Chinese instrumentalists’ intonation practice and agreement. Accordingly, this study examines the intonation practices of Chinese performers. Seventeen expert instrumentalists (9 winds and 8 strings) were chosen and asked to perform 3 performance tasks in 2 musical keys, and the pitches (n = 1428) extracted. Results show a scale contour favouring a slightly flattened ‘Re’ (–2.8¢), raised ‘Mi’ (+1.8¢) and raised ‘Ti’ (+2.1¢), computed relative to equal temperament. Further, ‘Mi’ (SD =  ±7.9¢) and ‘Ti’ (SD =  ±8.7¢) differed consistently (and noticeably) amongst wind and string instrumentalists. Subtler traits were also observed, with winds preferring a somewhat raised ‘Fa’ (+2.1¢) while strings preferred pronounced ‘Mi’ (+4.6¢) and ‘Ti’ (+4.7¢). The effect due to different musical key and performance tasks were also analysed and found to have a subtly systematic but minimal effect on pitch consistency.]

Published: Apr 13, 2021

Keywords: Intonation; Chinese instrumentalists; Pitch preference; Music temperament

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