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Quality of Life in IrelandConsistent Poverty and Economic Vulnerability

Quality of Life in Ireland: Consistent Poverty and Economic Vulnerability [One of the common criticisms of the ‘Celtic Tiger’ is that it left the poor further behind: even if they did not become poorer in absolute terms, what they got were mere crumbs compared to the bounty gained by the well-off. Increased marginalisation and social exclusion amid growing affluence has been a recurring theme. One of the problems with this argument is that it has relied, to a substantial extent, on trends in relative income poverty where households are counted as poor if their incomes fall below a certain fixed proportion of mean or median household income, adjusted for family size and composition. However, accurate income data are hard to collect and even when accurate do not always give a good indication of households’ command over resources. Therefore, a picture of poverty based on relative income alone is inadequate. Furthermore, as Chapter 3 has shown, particular difficulties arise in circumstances of exceptional growth, such as have characterised the recent Irish situation, where it is possible for the poor to gain quite substantial increases in income but at the same time continue to be classed as poor in relative income terms.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Quality of Life in IrelandConsistent Poverty and Economic Vulnerability

Part of the Social Indicators Research Series Book Series (volume 32)
Editors: Fahey, Tony; Russell, Helen; Whelan, Christopher T.
Quality of Life in Ireland — Jan 1, 2007

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Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007
ISBN
978-1-4020-6980-2
Pages
87 –103
DOI
10.1007/978-1-4020-6981-9_6
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[One of the common criticisms of the ‘Celtic Tiger’ is that it left the poor further behind: even if they did not become poorer in absolute terms, what they got were mere crumbs compared to the bounty gained by the well-off. Increased marginalisation and social exclusion amid growing affluence has been a recurring theme. One of the problems with this argument is that it has relied, to a substantial extent, on trends in relative income poverty where households are counted as poor if their incomes fall below a certain fixed proportion of mean or median household income, adjusted for family size and composition. However, accurate income data are hard to collect and even when accurate do not always give a good indication of households’ command over resources. Therefore, a picture of poverty based on relative income alone is inadequate. Furthermore, as Chapter 3 has shown, particular difficulties arise in circumstances of exceptional growth, such as have characterised the recent Irish situation, where it is possible for the poor to gain quite substantial increases in income but at the same time continue to be classed as poor in relative income terms.]

Published: Jan 1, 2007

Keywords: Relative Income; Material Deprivation; Income Poverty; Irish Society; Economic Vulnerability

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