Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Ralph H. Johnson (2000), Manifest Rationality. A Pragmatic Theory of Argument

Ralph H. Johnson (2000), Manifest Rationality. A Pragmatic Theory of Argument 232 BOOK REVIEW argument; formal deductive logic is a theory of implication, inductive logic a theory of inference (the differences between implication, inference, and argument remain to be investigated in a theory of reasoning). Hamblin, according to Johnson, did not sufficiently differentiate between these various forms of reasoning. An important reason for abandoning formal deductive logic as a theory of argument, Johnson contends, is the mathem- aticization of logic in the twentieth century. In part II, Johnson argues that a properly, that is pragmatically, recon- figured informal logic can meet the demands of a theory of argument. First, in Chapter 5, he reviews the theory of argument that has emerged under the title of informal logic, and concludes that it lacks an adequate con- ceptualization of argument. In Chapter 6, after criticizing the prevailing structural definitions of argument in the work of informal logicians as a group of propositions consisting of premises and conclusion, Johnson presents his own conceptualization of argument. The main purpose of argument is rational persuasion of ‘the Other’ (the practice of argumenta- tion being teleological), while taking the criticism of the Other into account (the practice of argumentation being dialectical). The premise-conclusion structure forming the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Argumentation Springer Journals

Ralph H. Johnson (2000), Manifest Rationality. A Pragmatic Theory of Argument

Argumentation , Volume 15 (2) – Oct 19, 2004

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/ralph-h-johnson-2000-manifest-rationality-a-pragmatic-theory-of-PoKU07i7cK

References (2)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Philosophy; Logic; Communication Studies; Theories of Law, Philosophy of Law, Legal History; Political Communication
ISSN
0920-427X
eISSN
1572-8374
DOI
10.1023/A:1011111203624
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

232 BOOK REVIEW argument; formal deductive logic is a theory of implication, inductive logic a theory of inference (the differences between implication, inference, and argument remain to be investigated in a theory of reasoning). Hamblin, according to Johnson, did not sufficiently differentiate between these various forms of reasoning. An important reason for abandoning formal deductive logic as a theory of argument, Johnson contends, is the mathem- aticization of logic in the twentieth century. In part II, Johnson argues that a properly, that is pragmatically, recon- figured informal logic can meet the demands of a theory of argument. First, in Chapter 5, he reviews the theory of argument that has emerged under the title of informal logic, and concludes that it lacks an adequate con- ceptualization of argument. In Chapter 6, after criticizing the prevailing structural definitions of argument in the work of informal logicians as a group of propositions consisting of premises and conclusion, Johnson presents his own conceptualization of argument. The main purpose of argument is rational persuasion of ‘the Other’ (the practice of argumenta- tion being teleological), while taking the criticism of the Other into account (the practice of argumentation being dialectical). The premise-conclusion structure forming the

Journal

ArgumentationSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 19, 2004

There are no references for this article.