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Rationis DefensorDefending Quine on Ontological Commitment

Rationis Defensor: Defending Quine on Ontological Commitment [In this paper I defend a Quinean view on ontological commitment against some recent challenges. I outline the virtues and limitations of the Quinean approach before considering two different theories. Thomas Hofweber argues that commitment in natural language is ambiguous and that Quine’s canonical notation is incapable of representing the two functions of natural language quantifiers. Truthmaker theorists argue that Quine’s approach is based on a fallacious view of the relation between true sentences and the truthmaking domain (the world). In response I argue that both objections are aimed at a particularly strong version of the Quinean approach, and that rather than abandon it we can use these challenges to understand its true value.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Rationis DefensorDefending Quine on Ontological Commitment

Part of the Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Book Series (volume 28)
Editors: Maclaurin, James
Rationis Defensor — Mar 14, 2012

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References (9)

Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012
ISBN
978-94-007-3982-6
Pages
177 –190
DOI
10.1007/978-94-007-3983-3_13
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[In this paper I defend a Quinean view on ontological commitment against some recent challenges. I outline the virtues and limitations of the Quinean approach before considering two different theories. Thomas Hofweber argues that commitment in natural language is ambiguous and that Quine’s canonical notation is incapable of representing the two functions of natural language quantifiers. Truthmaker theorists argue that Quine’s approach is based on a fallacious view of the relation between true sentences and the truthmaking domain (the world). In response I argue that both objections are aimed at a particularly strong version of the Quinean approach, and that rather than abandon it we can use these challenges to understand its true value.]

Published: Mar 14, 2012

Keywords: Natural Language; Ontological Commitment; Composite Object; True Sentence; Truthmaker Theorist

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