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Religious Conversions in the Mediterranean WorldParticipating without Converting: The Case of Muslims Attending St Anthony’s Church in Istanbul

Religious Conversions in the Mediterranean World: Participating without Converting: The Case of... [Every day, 2,000–3,000 visitors come to St Anthony’s church, located on Istiklâl Caddesi in Istanbul’s European historical centre.1 Most of them are Muslims (Dionigi and Fliche, 2012). They come in order to participate without any intention of converting. This Muslim frequentation of a Christian place of worship can be considered surprising. As a matter of fact, despite being officially ‘secular’, the Turkish state is not religiously neutral and has strong ties with Islam. Therefore for a Muslim in Turkey, visiting a Christian place means challenging social and religious conventions. The widespread fear of conversion makes visiting Christian places seem even more suspicious.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Religious Conversions in the Mediterranean WorldParticipating without Converting: The Case of Muslims Attending St Anthony’s Church in Istanbul

Part of the Islam and Nationalism Series Book Series
Editors: Marzouki, Nadia; Roy, Olivier

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References (7)

Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan UK
Copyright
© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 2013
ISBN
978-1-349-43457-2
Pages
162 –174
DOI
10.1057/9781137004895_10
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[Every day, 2,000–3,000 visitors come to St Anthony’s church, located on Istiklâl Caddesi in Istanbul’s European historical centre.1 Most of them are Muslims (Dionigi and Fliche, 2012). They come in order to participate without any intention of converting. This Muslim frequentation of a Christian place of worship can be considered surprising. As a matter of fact, despite being officially ‘secular’, the Turkish state is not religiously neutral and has strong ties with Islam. Therefore for a Muslim in Turkey, visiting a Christian place means challenging social and religious conventions. The widespread fear of conversion makes visiting Christian places seem even more suspicious.]

Published: Oct 12, 2015

Keywords: Religious Faith; Religious Authority; Religious Conversion; Sacred Space; Turkish State

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