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Rhetoric and Dialectic: Some Historical and Legal Perspectives

Rhetoric and Dialectic: Some Historical and Legal Perspectives The thesis is defended that rhetoric is not, as is often said, a discipline which is hierarchically subordinate to dialectic. It is argued that the modalities of the links between rhetoric and dialectic must be seen in a somewhat different light: rhetoric and dialectic should be viewed as two complementary disciplines. On the basis of a historical survey of the views of various authors on the links between rhetoric and dialectic, it is concluded that efforts to establish clear boundaries or unequivocal conceptual or moral hierarchical relationships between the two disciplines have failed and that therefore, they must be conceived as being mutually dependent. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Argumentation Springer Journals

Rhetoric and Dialectic: Some Historical and Legal Perspectives

Argumentation , Volume 14 (3) – Oct 3, 2004

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References (38)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Philosophy; Logic; Communication Studies; Theories of Law, Philosophy of Law, Legal History; Political Communication
ISSN
0920-427X
eISSN
1572-8374
DOI
10.1023/A:1007844811374
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The thesis is defended that rhetoric is not, as is often said, a discipline which is hierarchically subordinate to dialectic. It is argued that the modalities of the links between rhetoric and dialectic must be seen in a somewhat different light: rhetoric and dialectic should be viewed as two complementary disciplines. On the basis of a historical survey of the views of various authors on the links between rhetoric and dialectic, it is concluded that efforts to establish clear boundaries or unequivocal conceptual or moral hierarchical relationships between the two disciplines have failed and that therefore, they must be conceived as being mutually dependent.

Journal

ArgumentationSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 3, 2004

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