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Science and Technology in Homeric EpicsAmbrosia, Nectar and Elaion in the Homeric Poems

Science and Technology in Homeric Epics: Ambrosia, Nectar and Elaion in the Homeric Poems [Ambrosia and nectar, supposed to be the divine food consumed by the Greek gods, appears in the Homeric Poems as ointment, used as cosmetic to clean and care for the bodies of gods and mortals, as well as a substance preventing decomposition of dead bodies. Ambrosia was used both externally by application on the skin, as well as internally, along with nectar, in embalming processes. Although it is not possible to describe the composition and properties of ambrosia more specifically, in Homeric Poems, all references to ambrosia (noun and adjective) together with elaion, put the question of the early knowledge of the properties of elaion in general. From the several uses of elaion described in Homeric scenes, it is clear that the specific qualities attributed to elaion relate it with the immortal gods, not only symbolically, but also practically, through “divine” characteristics it could transmit to the mortals. The early knowledge of its qualities, at the time, definitively empirical, is confirmed by recent scientific research and explains many of the uses of various kinds of elaion during the past decades and, in some cases, even today.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Science and Technology in Homeric EpicsAmbrosia, Nectar and Elaion in the Homeric Poems

Part of the History of Mechanism and Machine Science Book Series (volume 6)
Editors: Paipetis, S. A.

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References (17)

Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
© Springer Netherlands 2008
ISBN
978-1-4020-8783-7
Pages
391 –399
DOI
10.1007/978-1-4020-8784-4_31
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[Ambrosia and nectar, supposed to be the divine food consumed by the Greek gods, appears in the Homeric Poems as ointment, used as cosmetic to clean and care for the bodies of gods and mortals, as well as a substance preventing decomposition of dead bodies. Ambrosia was used both externally by application on the skin, as well as internally, along with nectar, in embalming processes. Although it is not possible to describe the composition and properties of ambrosia more specifically, in Homeric Poems, all references to ambrosia (noun and adjective) together with elaion, put the question of the early knowledge of the properties of elaion in general. From the several uses of elaion described in Homeric scenes, it is clear that the specific qualities attributed to elaion relate it with the immortal gods, not only symbolically, but also practically, through “divine” characteristics it could transmit to the mortals. The early knowledge of its qualities, at the time, definitively empirical, is confirmed by recent scientific research and explains many of the uses of various kinds of elaion during the past decades and, in some cases, even today.]

Published: Jan 1, 2008

Keywords: Dead Body; Early Knowledge; Religious Rite; Cosmetic Ointment; Hippocratic Corpus

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