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Science and Technology in Homeric EpicsEarly Bronze Technology at Land's End, North Western Iberia

Science and Technology in Homeric Epics: Early Bronze Technology at Land's End, North Western Iberia [The North Western Iberia metal ore wealth, especially tin ore and gold, have been proposed as the main reason for the development of intense trade routes since early prehistory. Several authors have argued the existence of interactions between the northwest of the Iberian Peninsula and other cultures of the European Occident and the Mediterranean area. Ancient sources comment on the abundance of minerals and metals in the Cassiterides or Tin Islands. These accounts must have originated from sailors who from time immemorial were trading in these coasts. The name Cassiterides represents the first vague knowledge of the Greeks that tin was found overseas somewhere in or off Western Europe. The word κασσιτερΟζ was known to Homer and is mentioned ten times in the Iliad. Cape Finisterre (Land's End for the Romans) was proposed as the northernmost point recorded in the Periplous of Pytheas the Massaliot, which seems to be the basic source used by Rufus Festus Avienus. B. Cunliffe has suggested that if Cape Finisterre was the place called Oestrymnis by Avienus in Ora Marítima, then Periplous could be seen as the guide that led Greek sailors from Marseille to the northwest of Iberia to trade for the coveted Galician tin some time around 500 BC.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Science and Technology in Homeric EpicsEarly Bronze Technology at Land's End, North Western Iberia

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References (13)

Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
© Springer Netherlands 2008
ISBN
978-1-4020-8783-7
Pages
113 –131
DOI
10.1007/978-1-4020-8784-4_9
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[The North Western Iberia metal ore wealth, especially tin ore and gold, have been proposed as the main reason for the development of intense trade routes since early prehistory. Several authors have argued the existence of interactions between the northwest of the Iberian Peninsula and other cultures of the European Occident and the Mediterranean area. Ancient sources comment on the abundance of minerals and metals in the Cassiterides or Tin Islands. These accounts must have originated from sailors who from time immemorial were trading in these coasts. The name Cassiterides represents the first vague knowledge of the Greeks that tin was found overseas somewhere in or off Western Europe. The word κασσιτερΟζ was known to Homer and is mentioned ten times in the Iliad. Cape Finisterre (Land's End for the Romans) was proposed as the northernmost point recorded in the Periplous of Pytheas the Massaliot, which seems to be the basic source used by Rufus Festus Avienus. B. Cunliffe has suggested that if Cape Finisterre was the place called Oestrymnis by Avienus in Ora Marítima, then Periplous could be seen as the guide that led Greek sailors from Marseille to the northwest of Iberia to trade for the coveted Galician tin some time around 500 BC.]

Published: Jan 1, 2008

Keywords: Iberian Peninsula; Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis; Bronze Alloy; Prestige Good; Bronze Object

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