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Science, Religion and Communism in Cold War EuropeWriting Rituals: The Sources of Socialist Rites of Passage in Hungary, 1958–1970

Science, Religion and Communism in Cold War Europe: Writing Rituals: The Sources of Socialist... [Focusing on the development of socialist rites of passage in Hungary, the chapter makes two arguments. First, that the early 1960s were a phase of intense experimentation, in which the individual initiative of party cadres played a more important role than specific directives. And second, that the development of a specifically Hungarian form of ‘applied atheism’ had an international dimension as ritual experts traveled across the Eastern Bloc to search for inspiration but also for a ground of comparison. For Hungarian ritual experts, Czechoslovakia was a more important reference point than the Soviet Union in this context. As a composite, the two arguments nuance our understanding of dynamics of the so-called conflict between the religious and atheist world view.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Science, Religion and Communism in Cold War EuropeWriting Rituals: The Sources of Socialist Rites of Passage in Hungary, 1958–1970

Part of the St Antony's Series Book Series
Editors: Betts, Paul; Smith, Stephen A.

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Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan UK
Copyright
© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s) 2016
ISBN
978-1-137-54638-8
Pages
179 –203
DOI
10.1057/978-1-137-54639-5_8
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[Focusing on the development of socialist rites of passage in Hungary, the chapter makes two arguments. First, that the early 1960s were a phase of intense experimentation, in which the individual initiative of party cadres played a more important role than specific directives. And second, that the development of a specifically Hungarian form of ‘applied atheism’ had an international dimension as ritual experts traveled across the Eastern Bloc to search for inspiration but also for a ground of comparison. For Hungarian ritual experts, Czechoslovakia was a more important reference point than the Soviet Union in this context. As a composite, the two arguments nuance our understanding of dynamics of the so-called conflict between the religious and atheist world view.]

Published: May 15, 2016

Keywords: Local Council; Local Initiative; Socialist Culture; Ritual Practice; Socialist Society

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