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Scientia in Early Modern PhilosophyMatter, Mortality, and the Changing Ideal of Science

Scientia in Early Modern Philosophy: Matter, Mortality, and the Changing Ideal of Science [“Nihil sciatur” said Gassendi, echoing the sixteenth century sceptics Michel Montaigne and Francisco Sanchez, and he proceeded to attack, in his unfinished Exercitationes of 1624, the edifice of Aristotelian physics, metaphysics, theory of the soul, and teachings on generation and corruption.] http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Scientia in Early Modern PhilosophyMatter, Mortality, and the Changing Ideal of Science

Part of the Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Book Series (volume 24)
Editors: Sorell, Tom; Rogers, G.A.; Kraye, Jill

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Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010
ISBN
978-90-481-3076-4
Pages
35 –51
DOI
10.1007/978-90-481-3077-1_3
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

[“Nihil sciatur” said Gassendi, echoing the sixteenth century sceptics Michel Montaigne and Francisco Sanchez, and he proceeded to attack, in his unfinished Exercitationes of 1624, the edifice of Aristotelian physics, metaphysics, theory of the soul, and teachings on generation and corruption.]

Published: Sep 28, 2009

Keywords: Seventeenth Century; Human Soul; Philosophical Writing; Distinct Idea; Thinking Matter

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