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Secondary Victimization of Crime Victims by Criminal Proceedings

Secondary Victimization of Crime Victims by Criminal Proceedings It is conceivable that criminal proceedings cause psychological harm to the crime victims involved, that is, cause secondary victimization. To investigate this hypothesis, negative and positive effects of criminal proceedings were investigated, as perceived by 137 victims of violent crimes who were involved in trials several years previously. Trial outcome and procedure variables were measured as potential causes of secondary victimization. Results show a high proportion of victims reporting overall negative effects. Powerful predictors were outcome satisfaction and procedural justice, but not subjective punishment severity, interactional justice, and psychological stress by criminal proceedings. The practical implications of the results pertain to whether victims should be advised to report the crime to the police or not, and to appropriate prevention and intervention measures of secondary victimization by criminal proceedings. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Justice Research Springer Journals

Secondary Victimization of Crime Victims by Criminal Proceedings

Social Justice Research , Volume 15 (4) – Oct 13, 2004

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References (41)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 by Plenum Publishing Corporation
Subject
Psychology; Personality and Social Psychology; Sociology, general; Political Science; Anthropology; Philosophy, general; Social Policy
ISSN
0885-7466
eISSN
1573-6725
DOI
10.1023/A:1021210323461
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

It is conceivable that criminal proceedings cause psychological harm to the crime victims involved, that is, cause secondary victimization. To investigate this hypothesis, negative and positive effects of criminal proceedings were investigated, as perceived by 137 victims of violent crimes who were involved in trials several years previously. Trial outcome and procedure variables were measured as potential causes of secondary victimization. Results show a high proportion of victims reporting overall negative effects. Powerful predictors were outcome satisfaction and procedural justice, but not subjective punishment severity, interactional justice, and psychological stress by criminal proceedings. The practical implications of the results pertain to whether victims should be advised to report the crime to the police or not, and to appropriate prevention and intervention measures of secondary victimization by criminal proceedings.

Journal

Social Justice ResearchSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 13, 2004

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